Zedoary

What other names is Zedoary known by?

Amomum zedoaria, Cedoaria, Cetoal, Curcuma Sauvage, Curcuma zedoaria, E-Zhu, Essence de Zédoaire, Gingembre Bâtard, Herbe à l'Estomac, Huile de Zédoaire, Indian Arrowroot, Kua, Rhizome de Zédoaire, Round Zedoary, Sati, Shati, Temu Kuning, Temu Putih, Zedoaire, Zédoaire, Zedoaria, Zedoarie Rhizoma, Zedoary Oil, Zedoary Turmeric, Zedoary Turmeric Oil, Zitwer, Zitwerwirtzelstock, ZTO.

What is Zedoary?

Zedoary is a plant. The underground stem (rhizome) is used to make medicine.

Traditional methods for preparing zedoary involve washing it with lots of water to remove most of the protein and water-soluble nutrients. The rinsing is also supposed to remove a poison that is yet to be identified.

Zedoary is used for colic, spasms, loss of appetite, and indigestion. Some people also use it for anxiety, stress, fatigue, and pain and swelling (inflammation).

Zedoary is sometimes applied directly to the skin to keep mosquitoes away.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of zedoary for these uses.

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How does Zedoary work?

There is not enough scientific information available to know how zedoary might work for medical conditions. Zedoary has not been studied in people. It has only been studied in animals or in test tubes. Some of this research suggests that zedoary can act like an antibiotic. It also might repel mosquitoes.

Are there safety concerns?

There isn't enough information to known whether zedoary is safe. So far, no harmful side effects have been reported.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is UNSAFE to take zedoary if you are pregnant. There is concern that it might cause a miscarriage.

It's also best to avoid zedoary if you are breast-feeding, since there isn't enough scientific information to know how it might affect a nursing infant.

Heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia): Some experts suggest that zedoary should not be used by women who have heavy menstrual periods.

Dosing considerations for Zedoary.

The appropriate dose of zedoary depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for zedoary. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Champakaew D, Choochote W, Pongpaibul Y, et al. Larvicidal efficacy and biological stability of a botanical natural product, zedoary oil-impregnated sand granules, against Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae). Parasitol Res 2007;100:729-37. View abstract.

Gupta SK, Banerjee AB, Achari B. Isolation of Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate, the major antifungal principle of Curcumba zedoaria. Lloydia 1976;39:218-22. View abstract.

Kim DI, Lee TK, Jang TH, Kim CH. The inhibitory effect of a Korean herbal medicine, Zedoariae rhizoma, on growth of cultured human hepatic myofibroblast cells. Life Sci 2005;77:890-906. View abstract.

Lai EY, Chyau CC, Mau JL, et al. Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of the essential oil of Curcuma zedoaria. Am J Chin Med 2004;32:281-90. View abstract.

Latif MA, Morris TR, Miah AH, et al. Toxicity of shoti (Indian arrowroot: Curcuma zedoaria) for rats and chicks. Br J Nutr 1979;41:57-63. View abstract.

Matsuda H, Ninomiya K, Morikawa T, et al. Inhibitory effect and action mechanism of sesquiterpenes from Zedoariae Rhizoma on D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury. Bioorg Med Chem Lett 1998;8:339-44. View abstract.

Pitasawat B, Champakaew D, Choochote W, et al. Aromatic plant-derived essential oil: an alternative larvicide for mosquito control. Fitoterapia 2007;78:205-10. View abstract.

Robbers JE, Tyler VE. Tyler's Herbs of Choice: The Therapeutic Use of Phytomedicinals. New York, NY: The Haworth Herbal Press, 1999.

Syu WJ, Shen CC, Don MJ, et al. Cytotoxicity of curcuminoids and some novel compounds from Curcuma zedoaria. J Nat Prod 1998;61:1531-4. View abstract.

Wilson B, Abraham G, Manju VS, et al. Antimicrobial activity of Curcuma zedoaria and Curcuma malabarica tubers. J Ethnopharmacol 2005;99:147-51. View abstract.

Yoshioka T, Fujii E, Endo M, et al. Antiinflammatory potency of dehydrocurdione, a zedoary-derived sesquiterpene. Inflamm Res 1998;47:476-81. View abstract.