Fruits that have the least amount of sugar
Here are 15 fruits that are low in sugar content, which include tomatoes, strawberries, lemons, and oranges.

Although fruits are undoubtedly powerhouses of nutrients, many people tend to avoid them fearing their natural sugar content.

  • Sugars are simple carbohydrates that are sweet to taste, which include sucrose (table sugar), fructose (also called fruit sugar), and glucose.
  • Nonetheless, several fruits contain fewer sugars per unit weight and healthy fiber content that provide an ideal snacking option for weight-watchers, people on a keto diet, and those with diabetes.

15 low-sugar fruits

15 fruits that are low in sugar (contain on average less than 11 grams of sugar per 100 grams of the fruit) include

  1. Tomatoes
    • (2.6 grams sugars and 3.9 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  2. Watermelons
    • (6 grams sugars and 7.5 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  3. Cantaloupe
    • (8 grams sugars and 8 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  4. Peaches
    • (8 grams sugars and 10 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  5. Strawberries
    • (4.9 grams sugars and 8 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  6. Avocados
    • (0.7 grams sugars and 9 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  7. Blueberries
    • (6 grams sugars and 9 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  8. Honeydew
    • (8 grams sugars and total 9 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  9. Lemons
    • (2.5 grams sugar and 9 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  10. Pineapples
    • (10 grams sugars and 11 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  11. Plums
    • (10 grams sugars and 11 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  12. Oranges
    • (9 grams sugars and 12 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  13. Raspberries
    • (4.4 grams sugars and 12 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  14. Dragon fruits
    • (7.6 grams sugars and 13 grams total carbs per 100 grams)
  15. Guava
    • (9 grams sugar and 15 grams total carbs per 100 grams)

7 fruits that are high in sugars

Some of the fruits that are known to contain a high amount of sugars include:

  1. Mangos
  2. Grapes
  3. Bananas
  4. Pears
  5. Cherries
  6. Figs
  7. Lychee

Although a distinction can be made between fruits based on their sugar content, it is the serving size that matters a lot.

Therefore, if you consume a hearty wedge of watermelon (300 grams) containing just six grams of sugars per 100 grams of the fruit, you may end up consuming about 20 grams of sugar. This is comparable to consuming a cup of cut mango pieces containing about 23 grams of sugar.

Hence, the key is moderation or having smaller servings. You will be able to enjoy your favorite fruits this way without any fear of spiking your sugar levels.

How many servings of fruits should you have in a day?

The American Heart Association recommends that one should have about five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. It further adds that the best combination is having two servings of fruits and three servings of vegetables a day.

One serving of fruit equals:

  • One whole medium-size fruit such as peach, apple, banana, or orange.
  • Half a cup of diced fresh, frozen, or canned fruits.
  • One-fourth cup of dried fruits.
  • One-fourth cup of fruit juice.
  • One fresh apricot or half cup canned or five dried.
  • One ounce of resins.

You must aim to consume various types of fruits and vegetables to obtain several nutrients and their health benefits.

Although a single serving of 100 percent juice can replace one of your recommended daily servings of fruits, it is always better to eat the fruit instead of having its juice. Fruits provide a lot of fiber and thus are good for your gut, heart, and general health. They are also more filling than juices with the same number of calories.

Avoid consuming fruits and juices with added sugars or salts.

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Medically Reviewed on 11/23/2021
References
Image Source: iStock Images

https://newsroom.heart.org/news/the-right-5-a-day-mix-is-2-fruit-and-3-vegetable-servings-for-longer-life

https://www.health.harvard.edu/nutrition/how-many-fruits-and-vegetables-do-we-really-need

https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/add-color/fruits-and-vegetables-serving-sizes

https://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-fruit-sugar