What Happens if You Eat Yogurt Every Day?

Medically Reviewed on 6/4/2021

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends three cup equivalents of dairy per day (including yogurt, cream cheese, low-fat milk) for those older than nine years of age. So, if people stay within recommended limits, yogurt will help keep them healthy.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends three-cup equivalents of dairy per day (including yogurt, cream cheese, low-fat milk) for those older than nine years of age. So, if people stay within recommended limits, yogurt will help keep them healthy.

Yogurt is a healthy and tasty source of protein that many people like. Made from fermented milk, yogurt can be consumed as a spiced salad dressing, dip, drink, or in flavored frozen form as a dessert and snack. The sugar in yogurt is partially broken down by the bacteria it contains, hence many lactose-intolerant individuals can consume it without getting bloating, cramps, and loose stools.

In traditional Indian medicine, yogurt has been used to treat everything, including recovering from a bout of stomach flu to sunburn relief. It has a place of honor in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisine as well.

What happens if you eat yogurt every day?

What happens if you eat yogurt every day?

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends three cup equivalents of dairy per day (including yogurt, cream cheese, low-fat milk) for those older than nine years of age. So, if people stay within recommended limits, yogurt will help keep them healthy. The good news is, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates yogurt products. Low-fat yogurt must have 0.5 to 2 percent fat and contain no less than 8.25 percent milk solids. Nonfat yogurt must be less than 0.5 percent fat and contain no less than 8.25 percent milk solids. So, be mindful of the label before buying yogurt. Go for the low-fat or nonfat yogurt variety to avail health benefits.

Daily intake of yogurt in moderation has the following benefits:

  • Bone health: Yogurt is abundant in calcium, zinc, B complex vitamins and is a concentrated form of milk proteins. This makes it important for good bone health. Commercial yogurt is often supplemented with vitamin D and can be consumed by the elderly, who have a risk of low bone mass and poor bone health. The regular consumption of yogurt in the elderly has been consistently associated with less bone resorption (porosity) and increased calcium deposition in the bones. The long shelf life and ease of yogurt consumption make it an excellent nutrition option for the elderly.
  • Immunity: Yogurt contains cultures of probiotics (good bacteria). This can help improve gut immunity. A lot of individuals with irritable bowel syndrome or those recovering from a bout of gastroenteritis report relief of symptoms after adding low-fat yogurt to the diet. Owing to its zinc, vitamin B6 and Lactobacillus content, yogurt also enhances the overall immune response and reduces the risk of infections, such as seasonal flu and diarrhea. Some research suggests that yogurt inhibits the bacteria called H pylori in the stomach and intestine. This bacterium has been linked to gastritis and stomach cancer. Regular intake of sugar-free yogurt provides protection against vaginal discharge and fungal infections, too.
  • Metabolism: Yogurt is packed with nutrients. It is filling when eaten as a snack. Eating two to three servings of yogurt per week decreases sugar and caffeine cravings. This helps with weight management and improved heart health. It also reduces the risk of diabetes and age-related cognitive impairment.

Table. Nutrients in 3 ¼ ounce serving of plain low-fat yogurt

 Nutrients       Content    
 Carbs  6 grams (6 percent of the recommended dietary allowance)
 Protein  8 grams (11 percent of the recommended dietary allowance)
 Calcium  183 mg
 Magnesium  17 mg
 Potassium  234 mg
 Phosphorous  144 mg
 Zinc  0.9 mg
 Riboflavin  0.21 mg
 Niacin  0.11 mg
 Vitamin B6  0.05 mg
 Vitamin B12  0.56 mg

Yogurt is an excellent source of high biological quality proteins. The proteolytic activity of bacteria cultures enables predigestion of milk proteins, allowing for better protein digestibility.

Is there any harm in eating yogurt?

Eating two to three containers of yogurt every day can add around 500 calories and close to 100 grams of sugar to the daily diet. This can cause unwanted weight gain and increase the risk of diabetes. There have been gastroenteritis outbreaks in the past because of the use of unpasteurized milk in yogurt. Those with a milk allergy may be unable to digest milk sugars and experience bloating, cramps and even a skin rash.

Always consult a qualified dietician to know the ideal serving of yogurt one should have and the recommended type for their diet.

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Medically Reviewed on 6/4/2021
References
Yogurt: role in healthy and active aging. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6410895/#bib42

Food Source Information – Colorado. https://fsi.colostate.edu/yogurt/