Are cherry angiomas dangerous?

Cherry angiomas are noncancerous red bumps that form due to the clustering of blood vessels on the skin. Cherry angiomas are a sign of age, certain medical conditions, chemical exposure, climate factors and pregnancy.
Cherry angiomas are noncancerous red bumps that form due to the clustering of blood vessels on the skin. Cherry angiomas are a sign of age, certain medical conditions, chemical exposure, climate factors and pregnancy.

Cherry angiomas are noncancerous red bumps that form due to the clustering of blood vessels on the skin. They mostly occur in older people (older than 30 years of age).

These benign tumors are associated with aging and usually increase in number as you get old.

Cherry angiomas should not cause any concern because they are harmless. However, you should consult a physician if you notice a sudden outbreak of several lesions together. These could probably spider angiomas caused due to liver damage.

You should also consult a physician if your angioma

  • Starts to bleed
  • Feels uncomfortable
  • Changes in appearance

What is cherry angioma?

Cherry angiomas are small, bright red, skin growths formed due to the clustering of blood vessels. They are also known as senile angioma, capillary angioma, cherry hemangioma, Campbell de Morgan spots or cherry red skin papules/moles. The size of the angiomas can vary from a pinhead to about a quarter-inch in diameter. The cherry angioma usually appears on the trunk, arms, legs and shoulders. The exact cause of cherry angioma is unknown, but they are mostly genetic. Some environmental factors may also contribute to cherry angioma.

What are the symptoms of cherry angioma?

The most common signs and symptoms that indicate you have developed cherry angioma include

  • Having a bright cherry red growth or mole on your skin. They may even have other colors, such as blue, purple or black.
  • Having raised or flat appearances. The flat angiomas blend into the skin more smoothly. With age, these angiomas tend to elevate.
  • Differing in sizes. They could be the size of a pinhead size or a quarter of an inch in diameter.
  • Bleeding, swelling and other signs of irritation may occur in some cases.
  • Most times, the angioma may be firm to the touch, especially in the center.
  • The appearance of angioma should stay consistent over time. If you notice any changes, then inform your physician immediately because it may hint at another problem.

What are the causes of cherry angioma?

The exact cause of cherry angiomas is unknown. However, they may run in families. Some other risk factors include

  • Pregnancy
  • Exposure to chemicals, especially bromide
  • Climate
  • Certain medical conditions
  • Age

How do you treat cherry angiomas?

There is no reason that you may want to treat a cherry angioma because it is absolutely harmless. However, you may want to remove it due to cosmetic reasons.

You may also want to remove these bumps or moles if they tend to bleed easily. Some of the most common procedures include

  • Electrocauterization: In this surgery, the angioma is burnt with the help of an electric current delivered by a tiny probe.
  • Cryosurgery: Cryosurgery is a quick and relatively hassle-free procedure. It involves freezing the angioma with liquid nitrogen. The extreme cold will terminate angioma.
  • Laser surgery: This surgery uses a pulsed dye laser to eliminate cherry angioma. The laser emits sufficient heat to destroy the lesion.
  • Shave excision: This surgery involves the removal of angiomas from the top portion of the skin. Unlike other invasive surgery that utilizes needles and sutures, this surgery doesn’t require those.

You may have to follow-up approximately a month after the initial therapy. You may also require more than a single session to eliminate the moles.

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Medically Reviewed on 2/19/2021
References
Medscape Medical Reference