trioxsalen-oral, Trisoralen

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trioxsalen-oral, Trisoralen

GENERIC NAME: TRIOXSALEN - ORAL (try-OCK-sull-in)

BRAND NAME(S): Trisoralen

Warning | Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage

WARNING: Because serious side effects could occur during treatment with trioxsalen (eye lens damage, other skin problems), patients must be carefully selected and be under close medical supervision.

USES: This medication is a photosensitizer used to increase skin tolerance to sunlight and enhance pigmentation. It darkens the skin and thickens skin layers. It is used with UV light therapy.

HOW TO USE: Take this medication by mouth as directed with food or milk to prevent stomach upset. It is usually taken 2 to 4 hours before exposure to UV light. Do not increase your dose or take this more often than prescribed.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset, headache, skin tenderness, nervousness, swelling of the hands or feet, leg cramps, skin rash, skin burns or itching may occur. Notify your doctor if any of these effects is severe or continues. Use of this medication has been associated with increased risk of eye damage, skin aging and skin cancer. Discuss the risks and benefits of this therapy with your doctor. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: liver disease, eye problems, heart disease, history of cancer, porphyria, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. It is not known if this medication is found in breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, especially of: sulfa or tetracycline antibiotics, water pills, griseofulvin, phenothiazines, coal tar products. Ingestion of certain foods may increase the risk of side effects of this medication. Use them sparingly, if at all, during therapy: limes, figs, carrots, celery, mustard, parsnips, parsley. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval.

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. Symptoms of overdose may include severe skin burns or blistering.

NOTES: Follow your doctors instructions closely for UV light exposure. Overexposure to sunlight or sunlamp can result in severe burns.

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered; do not take it if it is near the time for the next dose, instead, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up.

STORAGE: Store at room temperature between 59 and 86 degrees F (15 to 30 degrees C) away from heat and light. Do not store in the bathroom.

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

Reviewed on 3/2/2005
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