triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% dental paste

  • Medical Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

What is triamcinolone dental? How is triamcinolone dental used?

Triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% dental paste is a prescription medicine used to treat painful lesions in the mouth. Triamcinolone is commonly used in various conditions and is available in oral, nasal, injectable, topical, ophthalmic injection, and spray preparations. Triamcinolone was first approved by the FDA in 1957.

Like other corticosteroids, triamcinolone has anti-inflammatory and antipruritic (anti-itch) properties. Corticosteroids are natural substances produced by the adrenal glands located adjacent to the kidneys. Corticosteroids have potent anti-inflammatory properties. Corticosteroids prevent release of chemicals that cause inflammation.

What brand names are available for triamcinolone dental?

N/A

Is triamcinolone dental available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

Do I need a prescription for triamcinolone dental?

Yes

What are the side effects of triamcinolone dental?

Use of triamcinolone acetonide dental paste may cause some local side effects such as

  • burning,
  • itching,
  • irritation,
  • dryness, and
  • peeling where it is applied.

Other side effects reported include

  • peri-oral dermatitis,
  • allergic contact dermatitis,
  • maceration of the oral mucosa,
  • secondary infection, and
  • atrophy of the oral mucosa.

What is the dosage for triamcinolone dental?

To treat oral lesions, use a small dab (about ¼ inch) to cover the lesion with a thin film. A larger quantity may be required for some lesions. For best results, only use enough paste to coat the lesion with a thin film. Do not rub in.

Depending on severity of symptoms, two or three applications per day may be required, preferably after meals. The paste should be applied at bedtime to allow contact with the lesion throughout the night. If symptoms do not improve in seven days, patients should seek further medical advice.

To prevent unwanted side effects, corticosteroids should be used for the shortest duration possible. Therapy should be discontinued as soon as control of symptoms is achieved.

Triamcinolone acetonide dental paste should not be used in the presence of fungal, viral, or bacterial infections of the mouth or throat.

Which drugs or supplements interact with triamcinolone dental?

Since triamcinolone acetonide dental paste is used topically and for short durations, clinically significant blood absorption is not thought to occur. As a result, the risk for drug interactions with triamcinolone acetonide dental paste and other medications is relatively low.

QUESTION

What causes tooth decay? See Answer

Is triamcinolone dental safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

Triamcinolone acetonide has been shown to cause birth defects in several animal species. As there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women, the risk of birth defects in humans is not known. Triamcinolone acetonide dental paste should only be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Triamcinolone acetonide dental paste is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C (Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks. Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks).

It is not known if oral application of triamcinolone acetonide results in detectable secretions into breast milk. Therefore, to avoid unwanted adverse effects in the nursing infant, triamcinolone dental paste should be used cautiously in nursing mothers.

What else should I know about triamcinolone dental?

What preparations of triamcinolone dental are available?

0.1% dental paste

How should I keep triamcinolone dental stored?

Triamcinolone acetonide dental paste should be stored at controlled room temperature between 15 C and 25 C (59 F and 77 F).

Summary

Triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% dental paste (Kenalog Orabase, Oralone in the US) is a dental paste prescribed to treat painful lesions in the mouth. Side effects, drug interactions, dosage, storage, and pregnancy and breastfeeding information should be reviewed prior to taking this drug.

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Medically Reviewed on 6/26/2019
References
FDA Prescribing Information.
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