Sweet Violet

What other names is Sweet Violet known by?

Banafshah, Fleur de Mars, Garden Violet, Herba Violae, Neelapushpa, Sweet Violet Herb, Sweet Violet Root, Viola odorata, Violae Odoratae Rhizoma, Viole de Carême, Violet, Violeta, Violette Commune, Violette des Haies, Violette de Mars, Violette Odorante, Violette à Parfum, Violier Commun, Wild Violet, Zi Hua Di Ding.

What is Sweet Violet?

Sweet violet is an herb. The root and parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.

Sweet violet is used for nervous strain, hysteria, physical and mental exhaustion, symptoms of menopause (hot flashes), depression, and irritability.

It is also used for digestive tract complaints such as abdominal pain, swelling (inflammation) of the stomach and intestines and the tissues that line them, digestion problems caused by improper diet, gas, heartburn, gallbladder disorders, and loss of appetite.

Some people use sweet violet for respiratory tract conditions, particularly dry or sore throat, stuffy nose, coughs, hoarseness, and bronchitis.

Other uses include treating pain in the minor joints, fever, skin diseases, headache, trouble sleeping (insomnia), and tuberculosis.

Sweet violet is sometimes applied directly to the skin for skin disorders and as a skin cleanser.

In herbal combinations, sweet violet is used for breathing problems including sudden (acute) and ongoing (chronic) bronchitis, asthma, emphysema, "dust-damaged" lungs, swelling (inflammation) of the respiratory tract, cold and flu symptoms, hoarseness, cough, and chest congestion. These herbal combinations are also used for involuntary urination (incontinence) in older people, bed-wetting, irritable bladder, and prostate conditions. Other uses include treating the inability to sleep (insomnia) and improving deep sleep.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of sweet violet for these uses.

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How does Sweet Violet work?

Sweet violet has chemicals that help break up chest congestion by thinning mucous and making it easier to cough up.

Are there safety concerns?

Sweet violet might be safe for most people when taken by mouth in recommended doses. No side effects have been reported.

There isn't enough information to know if it is safe to put sweet violet on the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of sweet violet during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for Sweet Violet.

The appropriate dose of sweet violet depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for sweet violet. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Last Editorial Review: 3/29/2011