Sweet Almond

What other names is Sweet Almond known by?

Almond, Almond Extract, Almond Oil, Almendra Dulce, Almendro Dulce, Amande, Amandier, Amande Douce, Amandier à Fruits Doux, Amandier Doux, Amendoa Doce, Amygdala Dulcis, Amygdalus communis var. dulcis, Expressed Almond Oil, Extrait d'Amande, Fixed Almond Oil, Huile d'Amande, Huile d'Amande Douce, Mandorla Dolce, Mindal' Sladkii, Prunus amygdalus var. dulcis, Prunus amygdalus var. sativa, Prunus communis var. sativa, Prunus dulcis, Suessmandel, Suessmandelbaum, Sweet Almond Oil, Zoete Amandel.

What is Sweet Almond?

Sweet almond is a plant. It produces kernels (nuts) that are a familiar food. Sweet almond oil, prepared by pressing the kernels, is used to make medicine.

Sweet almond is used as a mild laxative, and as a remedy for cancer of the bladder, breast, mouth, spleen, and uterus.

Some people apply sweet almond directly to the skin to soften chapped skin, to soothe mucous membranes, and to kill germs.

Sweet almond is also used to dissolve certain medications in a liquid so they can be given as shots.

In manufacturing, sweet almond is used widely in cosmetics.

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Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • High cholesterol. Early research suggests that eating raw almonds daily for 4-9 weeks might lower total cholesterol and “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in people with high cholesterol. However, eating almonds does not appear to improve “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or blood fats called triglycerides.
  • Skin damage caused by radiation treatment for cancer. Early research suggests that applying almond ointment to the skin does not protect against skin damage caused by radiation treatment in women with breast cancer.
  • Constipation.
  • Chapped and irritated skin.
  • Cancer of the bladder, breast, mouth, spleen, and uterus.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of sweet almond for these uses.

How does Sweet Almond work?

Sweet almond might work as a laxative due to the presence of many fatty acids. When applied to the skin, these same oily ingredients might help chapped skin and irritated mucous membranes.

Are there safety concerns?

There is not enough scientific information available to know if sweet almond is safe to use as medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking sweet almond if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Sweet almond might lower blood sugar in some people. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use sweet almond.

Surgery: Sweet almond might lower blood sugar in some people. In theory, sweet almond might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop using sweet almond at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

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Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Are there any interactions with medications?


Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Sweet almond might lower blood sugar in some people. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking sweet almond along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Dosing considerations for Sweet Almond.

The appropriate dose of sweet almond depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for sweet almond. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
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