Does Dexferrum (iron dextran) cause side effects?

Dexferrum (iron dextran) is an injectable form of iron used to treat iron-deficiency anemia, a condition in which the blood doesn't have enough healthy red blood cells because of a deficiency of available iron.

Dexferrum is only used to treat patients who cannot be adequately treated with oral iron supplements. Iron is an important mineral and is a necessary component of red blood cells and their ability to carry oxygen. Iron supplements replenish iron in the body and allow the transportation of oxygen.

Common side effects of Dexferrum include

Other side effects of Dexferrum include

Serious side effects of Dexferrum include

  • serious anaphylactic-type reactions, including death.

Large doses of Dexferrum may cause delayed reactions such as

No clinically important drug-drug interactions between Dexferrum and other medications have been reported by the manufacturer.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of Dexferrum in pregnant women. Dexferrum should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Small amounts of Dexferrum are excreted into human milk. Dexferrum should be used cautiously in breastfeeding women.

What are the important side effects of Dexferrum (iron dextran)?

Common side effects include:

Other possible side effects include:

Dexferrum (iron dextran) side effects list for healthcare professionals

SLIDESHOW

Anemia Symptoms and Signs, Types, Treatment and Causes See Slideshow

What drugs interact with Dexferrum (iron dextran)?

Drug/Laboratory Test Interactions

  • Large doses of iron dextran (5 mL or more) have been reported to give a brown color to serum from a blood sample drawn 4 hours after administration.
  • The drug may cause falsely elevated values of serum bilirubin and falsely decreased values of serum calcium.
  • Serum iron determinations (especially by colorimetric assays) may not be meaningful for 3 weeks following the administration of iron dextran.
  • Serum ferritin peaks approximately 7 to 9 days after an intravenous dose of Dexferrum and slowly returns to baseline after about 3 weeks.
  • Examination of the bone marrow for iron stores may not be meaningful for prolonged periods following iron dextran therapy because residual iron dextran may remain in the reticuloendothelial cells.
  • Bone scans with 99m Tc-labeled bone seeking agents, in the presence of high serum ferritin levels or following iron dextran infusions, have been reported to show reduction of bony uptake, marked renal activity, and excessive blood pool and soft tissue accumulation.

Summary

Dexferrum (iron dextran) is an injectable form of iron used to treat iron-deficiency anemia, a condition in which the blood doesn't have enough healthy red blood cells because of a deficiency of available iron. Common side effects of Dexferrum include diarrhea, headache, cramps, dizziness, upset stomach, changes in taste, and pain and irritation or swelling where the injection was given. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of Dexferrum in pregnant women. Small amounts of Dexferrum are excreted into human milk.

Treatment & Diagnosis

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Medically Reviewed on 10/29/2020
References
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Professional side effects and drug interactions sections courtesy of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.