Does Elocon (mometasone) cause side effects?

Elocon (mometasone) is a synthetic (man-made) glucocorticoid (steroid) used on the skin to relieve inflammation and itching of skin conditions such as dermatitis, eczema, rashes, skin allergies, anal itching, and more. 

The naturally-occurring glucocorticoid is cortisol or hydrocortisone which is produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Application of glucocorticoids such as Elocon to the skin may suppress the body's own production of cortisol by the adrenal glands. 

Elocon and others within its class are considered intermediate in potency and are less likely to have this effect as compared to highly potent glucocorticoids. Elocon works by suppressing inflammation and the immune response associated with inflammation. 

Common side effects of Elocon include

  • stinging,
  • burning,
  • itching,
  • irritation,
  • dryness, and
  • redness of the skin when first applied to the skin.

Serious side effects of Elocon include

Drug interactions of Elocon include anthralin topicals (used to treat psoriasis), since concomitant use with Elocon may increase the symptoms of psoriasis.  

There are no adequate studies of Elocon in pregnant women. Topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. 

It is unknown if Elocon is secreted in breast milk therefore caution should be exercised when administered to a breastfeeding woman.

What are the important side effects of Elocon (mometasone)?

The most commonly noted side effects associated with mometasone are:

  • stinging,
  • burning,
  • itching, and
  • irritation,

Dryness, or redness of the skin which may occur when this medication is first applied to the skin.

Elocon (mometasone) side effects list for healthcare professionals

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice.

  • In controlled clinical trials involving 319 subjects, the incidence of adverse reactions associated with the use of Elocon Cream was 1.6%.
  • Reported reactions included burning, pruritus, and skin atrophy.
  • Reports of rosacea associated with the use of Elocon Cream have also been received. In controlled clinical trials (n=74) involving pediatric subjects 2 to 12 years of age, the incidence of adverse experiences associated with the use of Elocon Cream was approximately 7%.
  • Reported reactions included stinging, pruritus, and furunculosis.

The following adverse reactions were reported to be possibly or probably related to treatment with Elocon Cream during clinical trials in 4% of 182 pediatric subjects 6 months to 2 years of age:

  • decreased glucocorticoid levels, 2;
  • paresthesia, 2;
  • folliculitis, 1;
  • moniliasis, 1;
  • bacterial infection, 1;
  • skin depigmentation, 1.

The following signs of skin atrophy were also observed among 97 subjects treated with Elocon Cream in a clinical trial:

  • shininess, 4;
  • telangiectasia, 1;
  • loss of elasticity, 4;
  • loss of normal skin markings, 4;
  • thinness, 1; and
  • bruising, 1.

The following additional local adverse reactions have been reported with topical corticosteroids, but may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings. These reactions are:

What drugs interact with Elocon (mometasone)?

No drug-drug interaction studies have been conducted with Elocon Cream.

Summary

Elocon (mometasone) is a synthetic (man-made) glucocorticoid (steroid) used on the skin to relieve inflammation and itching of skin conditions such as psoriasis, dermatitis, eczema, rashes, skin allergies, anal itching, and more. Common side effects of Elocon include stinging, burning, itching, irritation, dryness, and redness of the skin when first applied to the skin. There are no adequate studies of Elocon in pregnant women. Topical corticosteroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. It is unknown if Elocon is secreted in breast milk therefore caution should be exercised when administered to a breastfeeding woman.

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Medically Reviewed on 9/2/2020
References
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Professional side effects and drug interactions sections courtesy of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.