Does Stimate (desmopressin) cause side effects?

Stimate (desmopressin) is a man-made analog of vasopressin which is the body's natural anti-diuretic hormone released by the pituitary used to manage thirst and urination following head trauma or surgery involving the pituitary gland, and the treatment of diabetes insipidus.

It works by increasing water permeability in renal tubular cells, which decreases urine volume and increases urine concentration. 

Common side effects of Stimate include

Serious side effects of Stimate include

Drug interactions of Stimate include

There are no adequate studies done on Stimate to determine safe and effective use in pregnant women.

Stimate may be distributed in breast milk; however, there are no adequate studies done to determine infant risk. It should be used with caution by breastfeeding mothers.

What are the important side effects of Stimate (desmopressin)?

Side effects of Desmopressin are:

Changes in blood pressure, low sodium levels, and increased heart rate may occur.

Stimate (desmopressin) side effects list for healthcare professionals

  • Infrequently, DDAVP Injection has produced transient headache, nausea, mild abdominal cramps and vulval pain.
  • These symptoms disappeared with reduction in dosage.
  • Occasional facial flushing has been reported with the administration of DDAVP Injection.
  • Infrequently, high doses of intranasal DDAVP have produced transient headache and nausea.
  • Nasal congestion, rhinitis and flushing have also been reported occasionally along with mild abdominal cramps.
  • These symptoms disappeared with reduction in dosage.
  • Nosebleed, sore throat, cough and upper respiratory infections have also been reported.

In addition to those listed above, the following have also been reported in clinical trials with Stimate Nasal Spray:

DDAVP Injection (desmopressin acetate) has infrequently produced changes in blood pressure causing either a slight elevation or a transient fall with a compensatory increase in heart rate. Severe allergic reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported rarely with DDAVP Injection.

Post Marketing

There have been rare reports of convulsions from hyponatremia associated with concomitant use of desmopressin and the following medications: oxybutynin and imipramine. See prescribing information for the possibility of water intoxication, hyponatremia and coma.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact CSL Behring Pharmacovigilance at 1-866-915-6958 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www. fda.gov/medwatch.

What drugs interact with Stimate (desmopressin)?

  • Although the pressor activity of desmopressin acetate is very low, its use with other pressor agents should be done only with careful patient monitoring.
  • The concomitant administration of drugs that may increase the risk of water intoxication with hyponatremia (e.g., tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, chlorpromazine, opiate analgesics, NSAIDS, lamotrigine and carbamazepine) should be performed with caution.
  • DDAVP Injection has been used with epsilon aminocaproic acid without adverse effects.

Summary

Stimate (desmopressin) is a man-made analog of vasopressin, which is the body's natural anti-diuretic hormone released by the pituitary used to manage thirst and urination following head trauma or surgery involving the pituitary gland, and the treatment of diabetes insipidus. Common side effects of Stimate include headache, fatigue, runny nose, abdominal pain, and pink eye (conjunctivitis). There are no adequate studies done on Stimate to determine safe and effective use in pregnant women. Stimate may be distributed in breast milk; however, there are no adequate studies done to determine infant risk.

Treatment & Diagnosis

Medications & Supplements

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Medically Reviewed on 12/23/2020
References
FDA Prescribing Information

Professional side effects and drug interactions sections courtesy of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.