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What is the treatment for gynecomastia?

Gynecomastia, especially in pubertal males, often goes away on its own within about six months, so observation is preferred over specific treatment in many cases. Stopping any offending medications and treatment of underlying medical conditions that cause gynecomastia are also mainstays of treatment.

Treatments are also available to specifically address the problem of gynecomastia, but data on their effectiveness are limited, and no drugs have yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of gynecomastia. Medications are more effective in reducing gynecomastia in the early stages, since scarring often occurs after about 12 months. After the tissue has become scarred, medications are not likely to be effective, and surgical removal is the only possible treatment.

Medications that have been used to treat gynecomastia include:

  • Testosterone replacement has been effective in older men with low levels of testosterone, but it is not effective for men who have normal levels of the male hormone.
  • Clomiphene gynecomastia. It can be taken for up to 6 months.
  • The selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen (Nolvadex) has been shown to reduce breast volume in gynecomastia, it was not able to entirely eliminate all the breast tissue. This type of therapy is most often used for severe or painful gynecomastia.
  • Danazol is a synthetic derivative of testosterone that decreases estrogen synthesis by the testes. It works by inhibition of pituitary secretion of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), substances that direct the sex organs to produce hormones. It is less commonly used to treat gynecomastia than other medications.
Return to Gynecomastia (Enlarged Male Breasts Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments)

See what others are saying

Comment from: cornelius, 19-24 Male (Patient) Published: April 22

Four weeks ago, I was diagnosed with very low salt and an infection. I was treated at the hospital with an IV saline solution and IV antibiotics for five days, then discharged home on the seventh day. I developed a severe cold in the hospital and the symptoms are still lingering. Blood tests taken prior to a visit to my GP came back normal. Six days ago, I developed laryngitis, so my GP put me on Distaclor. I am still feeling no energy, my throat remains sore, and I have a cough. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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