Share your story with others:

MedicineNet appreciates your comment. Your comment may be displayed on the site and will always be published anonymously. Patient Comments FAQs


Tell us a bit about your background to make your comments more useful to other MedicineNet users.
(Optional)

Screen Name: *

Gender of Patient:Male Female

Age Range of Patient:

I am a: Patient Caregiver


Enter your Comment

* Screen Name will appear next to the published comment. Please do not include your full name or email address.

By submitting your comment, and other materials (collectively referred to as a "Submission") to MedicineNet, you grant MedicineNet permission to use, copy, transmit, publish, display, edit and modify your Submission in connection with its Web site. MedicineNet will not pay you for your Submission. You represent that you have all rights necessary for MedicineNet to use your Submission as set forth above.

Please keep these guidelines in mind when writing your comment:

  • Please make sure you address the question asked.
  • Due to the overwhelming number of comments received, not all comments will be published.
  • When selecting comments to publish, our staff will choose those that are educational and complement the topic. Please try to stay on topic.
  • Your comment may be edited. We would typically edit comments to make them clearer and more readable. We will remove personal information such as last names, email and web addresses, and other potentially harmful information.
  • We will not notify you if your comment has been published. We suggest that you check back on the topic article regularly.
  • We do not provide medical or healthcare advice, treatment, or diagnosis.

Thank you for participating!


I have read and agree to abide by the MedicineNet Terms and Conditions and the MedicineNet Privacy Policy (required).

To prevent our systems from spam, please complete the following prior to submitting your comment.




What causes cellulitis? Is cellulitis contagious?

The majority of cellulitis infections are caused by infection with either strep (Streptococcus) or staph (Staphylococcus) bacteria.

The most common bacteria that cause cellulitis are beta-hemolytic streptococci (groups A, B, C, G, and F). A form of rather superficial cellulitis caused by strep is called erysipelas and is characterized by spreading hot, bright red circumscribed area on the skin with a sharp, raised border. Erysipelas is more common in young children. The so-called "flesh-eating bacteria" are, in fact, also a strain of strep bacteria that can sometimes rapidly destroy deeper tissues underneath the skin. Fasciitis is the term used to refer to inflammation of the very deep lining tissues called fascia. The streptococcal infection known as flesh-eating bacterial infection is an example of fasciitis. Cellulitis, when untreated, may rarely spread to the deeper tissues and cause serious fasciitis.

Staph (Staphylococcus aureus), including methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA), is another common type of bacteria that causes cellulitis. There is a growing incidence of community-acquired infections due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), a particularly dangerous type of staph infection that is resistant to many antibiotics, including methicillin, and is therefore more difficult to treat.

Cellulitis can be caused by many other types of bacteria. In children under 6 years of age, H. flu (Hemophilus influenzae) bacteria can cause cellulitis, especially on the face, arms, and upper torso. Cellulitis from a dog or cat bite or scratch may be caused by the Pasteurella multocida bacteria, which has a very short incubation period of only four to 24 hours. Aeromonas hydrophilia, Vibrio vulnificus, and other bacteria are causes of cellulitis that develops after exposure to freshwater or seawater. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is another type of bacteria that can cause cellulitis, typically after a puncture wound.

Cellulitis is not contagious because it is a soft tissue infection of the skin's deeper layers (the dermis and subcutaneous tissue), and the skin's top layer (the epidermis) provides a cover over the infection. In this regard, cellulitis is different from impetigo, in which there is a very superficial skin infection that can be contagious.

Return to Cellulitis

See what others are saying

Comment from: dj, 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: August 16

My cause was from an injury I received from sliding into second base in baseball, then I got cellulitis.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: Marinit3, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: October 27

A simple manicure was the cause of my cellulitis infection in my finger.

Was this comment helpful?Yes
Comment from: mickey, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: September 14

I had chronic diarrhea and nausea for 6 days which caused the hyponatremia.

Was this comment helpful?Yes

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors