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What are the reasons for elevated blood creatinine?

Any condition that impairs the function of the kidneys is likely to raise the creatinine level in the blood. It is important to recognize whether the process leading to kidney dysfunction (kidney failure, azotemia) is longstanding or recent. Recent elevations may be more easily treated and reversed.

The most common causes of longstanding (chronic) kidney disease in adults are high blood pressure and diabetes. Certain drugs (for example, cimetidine [Bactrim]) can sometimes cause abnormally elevated creatinine levels. Serum creatinine can also transiently increase after ingestion of a large amount of dietary meat; thus, nutrition can sometimes play a role in creatinine measurement. Kidney infections, rhabdomyolysis (abnormal muscle breakdown) and urinary tract obstruction may also elevate creatinine levels.

Return to Creatinine (Blood Test, Normal and Elevated Levels)

See what others are saying

Comment from: tigerlily, 7-12 Male (Caregiver) Published: May 23

I use an ACE knee band that has Velcro strap and a hard center and put it on tight and sometimes it takes a couple of times using it. But when my bursitis flares up I can barely walk, until I have used the strap for a while. I also had the side of the foot broke the same side the knee pain is.

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Comment from: PeruGuy, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: October 25

Having traveled extensively around the world, I've seen two distinct ways people defecate. In India, Bangladesh, Africa, the Middle East, the Orient and small towns in the French countryside, I've seen toilets that look like ashtrays imbedded in the floor. 0ne must squat with feet on the ridges aiming at the hole below, forcing one into a deep squat or hunker. But with pants below the knees, it creates a risk of a dude's wallet in the back pocket falling into the nastiness. But without an option, one can easily adapt. I never had hemorrhoids until age 63 when I retired in Peru, where we have the conventional indoor throne. The hemorrhoids have persisted for ten years against all medical attempts short of surgery, until recently when I came across a Facebook post telling me to squat instead of sit. So I tried it. The hemorrhoids seem to be going away. For tons more information, Google 'squat vs sit.'

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Comment from: barbie, 75 or over (Patient) Published: October 10

I was a lucky person but very close to be paralyzed with cauda equina syndrome. I had gotten hurt on my job in my spine. I was operated on twice, then I had severe pain in my groin, legs, buttocks, etc. I was not able to move. My doctor saved my life. I still have a great deal of pain and now again the fear of a relapse. What I can say to all those who have any spine pain, please do not wait, get help. This article was great. I believe that you have to search for the best doctors. I have my days like today, severe pain on the one side, and unable to move. I am now going to see my doctor again. I am on morphine for pain with patches, and that helps a bit. I am very tired of having to deal with this for years due to an injury on my job. My problem started 10 years ago. Wish you all well, please do not wait to see a doctor, good luck.

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