Medical Definition of IPV

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Reviewed on 12/12/2018

IPV: Inactivated polio vaccine. The polio virus in IPV has been inactivated (killed). The inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is also called the Salk vaccine after the late American physician-virologist Jonas Salk.

The vaccines available for vaccination against polio are the IPV (inactivated polio vaccine) and the OPV (oral polio vaccine).

IPV (inactivated polio vaccine) is given as a shot in the arm or leg.

OPV (oral polio vaccine) is the preferred vaccine for most children. As its name suggests, it is given by mouth. Infants and children should be given four doses of OPV. The doses are given at 2 months, 4 months, 6-18 months and 4-6 years of age.

Persons allergic to eggs or the drugs neomycin or streptomycin should receive OPV, not the injectable IPV. Conversely, IPV should be given if the vaccine recipient is on long-term steroid (cortisone) therapy, has cancer, or is on chemotherapy or if a household member has AIDS or there is an unimmunized adult in the house.

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Reviewed on 12/12/2018