U.S. Suicide Rate Rose 33% Between 1999 and 2017

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The United States' suicide rate in 2017 was 33% higher than in 1999 and is at its highest since World War II, according to a new study.

It found that suicide rates among Americans ages 15-64 rose from 10.5 per 100,000 in 1999 to 14 per 100,000 in 2017, CNN reported.

American Indian or Alaska Natives had the highest increase among all racial/ethnic groups, according to the findings released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Statistics.

There were significant increases in suicide deaths among girls and women in all racial/ethnic groups except Asian or Pacific Islander. The largest increase (139%) was among American Indian or Alaska Native girls and women, CNN reported.

Significant increases were also seen in suicide rates among boys and men in all racial/ethnic groups except for Asian or Pacific Islander. The largest increase (71%) occurred among American Indian or Alaska Native boys and men.

American Indian or Alaska Native, ages 15 to 44, had the highest suicide rates for both males and females in 2017, CNN reported.

A separate study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that suicide rate among U.S. teens ages 15 to 19 rose from 8 per 100,000 in 2000 to 11.8 per 100,000 in 2017. Among young adults ages 20 to 24, the suicide rate rose from 12.5 per 100,000 in 2000 to 17 per 100,000 in 2017.

A CDC report released last year said U.S. suicide rates rose 25% between 1999 and 2016, CNN reported.

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