Tick-Caused Meat Allergy on Rise in U.S.

Red meat allergy caused by a bite from the lone star tick appears to be on the rise in the United States, a researcher says.

More than 5,000 cases have been reported in the U.S., up from 3,500 two years ago, according to Dr. Tara Narula, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CBS News reported.

It's only been within the last decade that medical experts have started to understand the condition, Narula said on CBS This Morning Thursday.

"In some cases it could be [permanent]," Narula said, "But in most cases we think it will dissipate over time, usually within a couple years. But if you get tick bites again, it's going to make the condition take longer to go away."

Hives, skin rash, stomach problems, headaches and trouble breathing are among the symptoms of the meat allergy. There is no treatment or cure. The only way to prevent symptoms is to avoid red meat, CBS News reported.

The lone star tick is most common in the South, but is also found in much of the eastern U.S. The ticks may be spreading to new areas as temperatures rise due to climate change, research suggests.

"The important thing is to do tick checks," Narula said. "When you come in from the outdoors, take a shower, put your clothes in the dryer on high-heat for ten minutes, avoid high grassy areas, stay on trails and treat your dogs."

MedicalNews
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