Woman Dies From Bee Sting Acupuncture

A Spanish woman died from an allergic reaction after she received acupuncture with live bee stings instead of needles.

The 55-year-old woman "developed wheezing, dyspnea, and a sudden loss of consciousness immediately after a live bee sting," according to a case study in the Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology.

She was rushed to hospital, where she died from multiple organ failure.

The journal article said the woman had been receiving this type of acupuncture (bee venom apithearpy) for two years without any reaction, and that this is the first reported death in a patient who previously had no trouble with the treatment, The Arizona Republic reported.

However, the authors noted that it is possible for a person to have a deadly allergic reaction after having the procedure a number of times.

While supporters claim the therapy eases pain and treats various conditions, the case study authors said it's dangerous.

"The risks of undergoing apitherapy may exceed the presumed benefits, leading us to conclude that this practice is both unsafe and unadvisable," wrote Paula Vazquez-Revuelta and Ricardo Madrigal-Burgaleta, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital in Spain, The Arizona Republic reported.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

A Spanish woman died from an allergic reaction after she received acupuncture with live bee stings instead of needles.

The 55-year-old woman "developed wheezing, dyspnea, and a sudden loss of consciousness immediately after a live bee sting," according to a case study in the Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology.

She was rushed to hospital, where she died from multiple organ failure.

The journal article said the woman had been receiving this type of acupuncture (bee venom apithearpy) for two years without any reaction, and that this is the first reported death in a patient who previously had no trouble with the treatment, The Arizona Republic reported.

However, the authors noted that it is possible for a person to have a deadly allergic reaction after having the procedure a number of times.

While supporters claim the therapy eases pain and treats various conditions, the case study authors said it's dangerous.

"The risks of undergoing apitherapy may exceed the presumed benefits, leading us to conclude that this practice is both unsafe and unadvisable," wrote Paula Vazquez-Revuelta and Ricardo Madrigal-Burgaleta, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital in Spain, The Arizona Republic reported.

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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