Medical Definition of Jellyfish sting

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Jellyfish sting: The injection into the skin of venom from the stinging unit (nematocyst) of the jellyfish. The jellyfish tentacles can extend for several feet and are lined with venom-filled cells (nematocysts). One tentacle may fire thousands of nematocysts into the skin on contact. The pain can be severe, particularly in the first hours after an attack, and itching is common. The victim may have weakness, nausea, headache, muscle pain and spasms, tearing and nasal discharge, increased perspiration, changes in pulse rate, and chest pain. Welting may persist for weeks at the site, and scarring may remain. Even dead jellyfish are capable of leaving a painful mark. Those who get serious stings may require oxygen or cardiorespiratory assistance. There is no antivenom for the stings of North American jellyfish, but there is antivenom for the stings of some Australian species.

CONTINUE SCROLLING OR CLICK HERE FOR RELATED ARTICLE
Reviewed on 9/7/2018

QUESTION

Allergies can best be described as: See Answer

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors