Medical Definition of T-suppressor cells

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Reviewed on 12/27/2018

T-suppressor cells: T cells that express the CD8 transmembrane glycoprotein (CD8+ T cells). They close down the immune response after invading organisms are destroyed. Suppressor T cells are sensitive to high concentrations of circulating lymphokine hormones, and release their own lymphokines after an immune response has achieved its goal. This signals all other immune-system participants to cease their attack. Some memory B-cells remain after this signal to ward off a repeat attack by the invading organism. Also known as T-8 cells.

See also CD8, T cells; T lymphocytes, cytotoxic.

CONTINUE SCROLLING OR CLICK HERE FOR RELATED SLIDESHOW

SLIDESHOW

Heart Disease: Causes of a Heart Attack See Slideshow

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors

Reviewed on 12/27/2018