Ptosis: Symptoms & Signs

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Related Symptoms & Signs

A drooping or sagging of the eyelid is medically known as ptosis or blepharoptosis. Drooping eyelids may occur on both sides (bilateral) or on one side only (unilateral), in which case it is more easily noticed. Congenital ptosis is eyelid drooping that is present at birth; when it develops later, it is referred to as acquired ptosis. Depending upon the severity of the condition, drooping eyelids may be barely noticeable or quite prominent. Some sagging of the skin and connective tissues occurs during the normal aging process, potentially leading to drooping of the eyelids. Other causes include conditions that affect the muscles and nerves of the eyelid as well as conditions that affect the skin and connective tissues of the eyelid. Rarely, tumors of the brain or eye area are the cause of drooping eyelids.

REFERENCE:

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/22/2017
Next Article

Subscribe to MedicineNet's General Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors