What is oxazepam, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Is oxazepam available as a generic drug?

Yes

Do I need a prescription for oxazepam?

Yes

What are the uses for oxazepam?

Oxazepam is used to treat anxiety and symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

What are the side effects of oxazepam?

The most common side effects associated with oxazepam treatment are

Other side effects include

QUESTION

Panic attacks are repeated attacks of fear that can last for several minutes. See Answer

What is the dosage for oxazepam?

The recommended dose of oxazepam is 10-30 mg by mouth 3-4 times daily as needed.

Which drugs or supplements interact with oxazepam?

Excessive sedation can occur when oxazepam is combined with certain other medications or substances that slow the brain's processes. Medications that should be avoided include sleeping aids, certain pain medications (narcotics), barbiturates, and alcohol.

Is oxazepam safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

What else should I know about oxazepam?

What preparations of oxazepam are available?

  • Oral capsules: 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg.
  • Tablet: 15 mg

How should I keep oxazepam stored?

Oxazepam capsules and tablets should be stored at room temperature, between 15 C to 30 C (59 F and 86 F).

Summary

Oxazepam (Serax, Zaxopam) is a prescription drug used to treat symptoms of alcohol withdrawal, and anxiety. Some side effects of Serax may include headache, confusion, dizziness, and decreased libido. Drug interactions, warnings and precautions, dosage, and pregnancy/breastfeeding safety information are provided.

Treatment & Diagnosis

Medications & Supplements

SLIDESHOW

Anxiety Disorder Pictures: Symptoms, Panic Attacks, and More with Pictures See Slideshow

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Medically Reviewed on 3/13/2019
References
Medically reviewed by John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP; Board Certified Emergency Medicine

REFERENCE:

FDA Prescribing Information.
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