Mountain Ash

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What other names is Mountain Ash known by?

Arbre aux Grives, Corbier d'Europe, Eberesche, Ebereschenbeeren, European Mountain-Ash, Pyrus aucuparia, Quickbeam, Rowan Tree, Serbal de los Cazadores, Sorb Apple, Sorbi Acupariae Fructus, Sorbier d'Europe, Sorbier des Oiseaux, Sorbier des Oiseleurs, Sorbier des Oiseliers, Sorbier Sauvage, Sorbus aucuparia, Witchen.

What is Mountain Ash?

Mountain ash is a plant. People use the berries to make medicine. The berries may be used fresh, dried, or cooked and then dried.

People take mountain ash for treating kidney disease, diabetes, arthritis, low levels of vitamin C (vitamin C deficiency), diarrhea, and menstrual problems. They also take it for reducing swelling (inflammation) of tissues that line the nose, throat, mouth (mucous membranes) and swelling in other parts of the body. Some people take mountain ash for treating lung conditions, especially conditions that cause a fever.

Other uses include correcting the way the body processes uric acid, "purifying the blood," and increasing metabolism.

In manufacturing, mountain ash is used as an ingredient in marmalade, stewed fruit, juice, liqueur, vinegar, and in tea mixtures.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Kidney diseases.
  • Diabetes.
  • Arthritis.
  • Swelling (inflammation).
  • Low levels of vitamin C (vitamin C deficiency).
  • "Purifying the blood."
  • Menstrual problems.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Lung conditions.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of mountain ash for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

Quick GuideVitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

How does Mountain Ash work?

Mountain ash berries contain many chemicals, including vitamin C. There isn't enough information to know how it might work for the conditions for which people use it.

Are there safety concerns?

Fresh mountain ash berries are UNSAFE. Large amounts can cause stomach irritation and pain, vomiting, queasiness, diarrhea, kidney damage, and other side effects.

There isn't enough information to know if the dried or cooked berries are safe.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE to use large amounts of fresh mountain ash berries. Not enough is known about the safety of dried or cooked berries. Stay on the safe side and avoid using any mountain ash product until more is known.

Dosing considerations for Mountain Ash.

The appropriate dose of mountain ash depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for mountain ash. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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