montelukast, Singulair

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Asthma Attack Treatment

What is montelukast, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Montelukast is an oral leukotriene receptor antagonist that is used for the treatment of asthma and seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Leukotrienes are a group of naturally occurring chemicals in the body that promote inflammation in asthma and seasonal allergic rhinitis and in other diseases in which inflammation is important (such as allergy). They are formed by cells, released, and then bound to other cells that cause inflammation. It is the binding to other cells that stimulates the cells to cause inflammation. Montelukast works in a manner similar to zafirlukast (Accolate), blocking the binding of some leukotrienes to the cells that cause inflammation. Unlike zafirlukast, montelukast does not inhibit CYP2C9 or CYP3A4, two enzymes in the liver that are important in breaking down and eliminating many drugs. Therefore, unlike zafirlukast, montelukast is not expected to affect the elimination of other drugs. The safety and effectiveness of montelukast has been demonstrated in children as young as 6 months of age. It was approved by the FDA in 1998.

What brand names are available for montelukast?

Singulair

Is montelukast available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

Do I need a prescription for montelukast?

Yes

What are the side effects of montelukast?

The most common side effects with montelukast are:

Other important side effects include:

Elevated liver enzymes, suicidal behavior, fluid retention, depression, and hallucinations have also been reported.

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Asthma Symptoms, Causes, and Medications

What is the dosage for montelukast?

The recommended dose of montelukast in adults is 10 mg daily for treating asthma and allergic rhinitis and 10 mg two hours before exercising for prevention of exercise induced bronchospasm. Montelukast should be taken in the evening with or without food when used for asthma or allergic rhinitis. The 4 and 5 mg tablets are used in children.

Which drugs or supplements interact with montelukast?

Phenobarbital, rifampin, and carbamazepine (Tegretol, Tegretol XR, Equertro, Carbatrol) may decrease blood concentrations of montelukast. This may reduce the effect of montelukast.

Is montelukast safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

Montelukast crosses the placenta into the fetus following oral administration to animals, but there have been no adequate studies in pregnant women to determine the effects on the fetus. Physicians may prescribe zafirlukast during pregnancy if it is felt that its benefits outweigh the potential but unknown risks to the fetus.

Studies in animals have shown that montelukast is excreted in milk; however, it is not known if montelukast is secreted into breast milk in humans.

What else should I know about montelukast?

What preparations of montelukast are available?

Tablets: 10 mg. Chewable tablets: 4 and 5 mg.

How should I keep montelukast stored?

Tablets should be stored at room temperature, 15 C - 30 C (59 F - 86 F).

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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See more info: montelukast on RxList
Reviewed on 1/12/2015
References
Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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