Mania: Symptoms & Signs

Mania refers to an abnormally elevated mood state. It is characterized by such symptoms as inappropriate elation, increased energy, irritability, severe insomnia, rapid or loud speech, disconnected and racing thoughts, impulsivity, markedly increased energy and activity level, increased libido (sexual desire), poor judgment, and inappropriate social behavior. Grandiose thinking (believing that one has special ability or powers) is often associated with mania. Those suffering from mania also may jump from one topic to another in conversation.

Causes of mania

Mania is a characteristic feature of bipolar disorder, sometimes referred to as bipolar depression. A person must have experienced at least one manic episode to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Major depressive episodes often alternate with manic episodes in bipolar disorder. The cause of bipolar disorder is not well understood, but both genetic and environmental factors are believed to be important.

Other mania symptoms and signs

  • Agitation
  • Appetite Changes
  • Decreased Need for Sleep
  • Elevated Mood
  • Feeling Wired or Jumpy
  • Grandiose Thoughts
  • Impulsivity
  • Inappropriate Elation (Euphoria)
  • Inappropriate Social Behavior
  • Increased Energy
  • Increased Goal Directed Activity
  • Increased Libido (Sex Drive)
  • Indulging in High-Risk Behaviors
  • Insomnia
  • Loud Speech
  • Mood Changes
  • Poor Judgment
  • Pressured Speech
  • Problems With Concentration
  • Racing Thoughts
  • Rapid Speech
  • Restlessness
  • Tangential Speech

QUESTION

Another term that has been previously used for bipolar disorder is ___________________. See Answer

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Medically Reviewed on 9/10/2019
References
United States. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Mental Health. "Bipolar Disorder." November 2015. <http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/bipolar-disorder/index.shtml>.
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