Linden

What other names is Linden known by?

Basswood, Bois de Tilleul, European Linden, Feuille de Tilleul, Feuille Séchée de Tilleul, Fleur de Tilleul, Fleur Séchée de Tilleul, Hungarian Silver Linden, Lime Blossom, Lime Flower, Lime Tree, Linden Charcoal, Linden Dried Flower, Linden Dried Leaf, Linden Dried Sapwood, Linden Flower, Linden Leaf, Linden Sapwood, Linden Wood, Silver Lime, Silver linden, Tila, Tilia argentea, Tilia cordata, Tilia europaea, Tiliae flos, Tiliae folium, Tilia grandifolia, Tiliae lignum, Tilia parvifolia, Tilia platyphyllos, Tilia rubra, Tilia tomentosa, Tilia ulmifolia, Tilia vulgaris, Tilleul, Tilleul à Feuilles en Cœur, Tilleul à Grandes Feuilles, Tilleul à Petites Feuilles, Tilleul d'Europe, Tilleul d'Hiver, Tilleul des Bois, Tilleul Mâle, Tilleul Sauvage, Tilo.

What is Linden?

Linden is a tree. The dried flower, leaves, and wood are used for medicine.

Linden leaf is used for colds, stuffy nose, sore throat, breathing problems (bronchitis), headaches, fever, and to make it easier to bring up phlegm by coughing (as an expectorant). It is also used for rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, excessive bleeding (hemorrhage), nervous tension, trouble sleeping (insomnia), problems with bladder control (incontinence), and muscle spasms. Linden leaf is also used to cause sweating and increase urine production.

Linden wood is used for liver disease and gallbladder disease, and for infection and swelling beneath the skin (cellulitis). Charcoal made from linden wood is used for intestinal disorders.

Some people apply linden directly to the skin for itchy skin, joint pain (rheumatism), and certain lower leg wounds (ulcus cruris) caused by poor blood circulation.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of linden for these uses.

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How does Linden work?

Linden seems to reduce the amount of mucus produced and relieve anxiety. But, more information is needed.

Are there safety concerns?

Linden might be safe when taken by mouth. When used on the skin, linden might cause itching.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of linden during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Heart disease: Frequent use of linden tea has been linked with heart damage. If you have heart disease, do not use linden without medical supervision.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Lithium
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Linden might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking linden might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

Dosing considerations for Linden.

The appropriate dose of linden depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for linden. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Last Editorial Review: 3/29/2011