Indium

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What other names is Indium known by?

Atomic number 49, Chlorure d'Indium, Colloidal Indium, In, Indio, Indium (III), Indium Chloride, Indium Colloïdal, Indium Compound, Indium Octreotide, Indium Pentetreotide, Indium Phosphide, Indium Salts, Indium Sulfate, Indium Sulfate Anhydrous, Indium Sulphate, Indium Tin Oxide, Indium Trichloride, Indium-111, Indium-111-octreotide, Indium-111-pentetreotide, Numéro Atomique 49, Pentétréotide d'Indium, Phosphure d'Indium, Préparation d'Indium, Sels d'Indium, Sulfate d'Indium, Trichlorure d'Indium.

What is Indium?

Indium is a soft, silver-white metal used in manufacturing. It is chemically similar to aluminum and gallium. Indium's most common industrial use is in the production of electrodes used in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Some dietary supplements contain indium.

Despite safety concerns, people take indium in supplements for increasing energy, preventing aging, boosting the immune system, increasing hormone production, and increasing absorption of nutrients.

Healthcare providers sometimes give an indium compound called indium pentetreotide by injection into the veins (intravenously) as a treatment for cancer that has spread to the bones.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Increasing energy.
  • Preventing aging.
  • Boosting the immune system.
  • Increasing hormone production.
  • Increasing absorption of nutrients.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of indium for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Indium work?

Indium does not have a biological role in the human body. There is no scientific support for claims that indium has beneficial effects.

Are there safety concerns?

Indium might be UNSAFE. Taking indium by mouth might result in damage to the kidneys, heart, liver, and other organs.

Breathing in indium might irritate the lungs.

Applying indium to the skin might cause skin irritation.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE for anyone to use indium as a medicine. While the effects of indium on an unborn infant or a nursing infant are unknown, the fact that it can cause damage to organs in adults is cause for concern. Don't use indium if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Dosing considerations for Indium.

The appropriate dose of indium depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for indium. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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