Indian Long Pepper

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What other names is Indian Long Pepper known by?

Bi Ba, Bi Bo, Jaborandi Pepper, Kana, Langer Pfeffer, Lindipipper, Long Pepper, Magadhi, Magdhi, Pimienta Larga, Pimenta-Longa, Piper longum, Pippali, Pippli, Poivre Long, Poivre Long d'Inde, Poivrier Long, Poivrier Long d'Inde, Poivre Long Indien, Ushana.

What is Indian Long Pepper?

Indian long pepper is a plant. The fruit of the plant is used to make medicine. Indian long pepper is sometimes used in combination with other herbs in Ayurvedic medicine.

Indian long pepper is used to improve appetite and digestion, as well as treat stomachache, heartburn, indigestion, intestinal gas, diarrhea, and cholera.

It is also used for lung problems including asthma, bronchitis, and cough.

Other uses include treatment of headache, toothache, vitamin B1 deficiency (beriberi), coma, epilepsy, fever, stroke, trouble sleeping (insomnia), leprosy, extreme tiredness, enlarged spleen, muscle pain, nasal discharge, paralysis, psoriasis, intestinal worms, snakebites, tetanus, thirst, tuberculosis, and tumors.

Some women use Indian long pepper during childbirth and during the 3-6 weeks following childbirth while the uterus returns to normal size. Women also use Indian long pepper to stimulate menstrual flow; to cause abortions; and to treat menstrual cramps, infertility, and loss of interest in sexual activity.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Indian long pepper for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Indian Long Pepper work?

Indian long pepper contains a chemical called piperine. Piperine may be able to fight certain parasites that can infect people. It also seems to change the lining of the intestines. This change allows some drugs and other substances taken by mouth to be better absorbed by the body.

Are there safety concerns?

There isn't enough information to know if Indian long pepper is safe for use as a medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of Indian long pepper during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Phenytoin (Dilantin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Indian long pepper might increase how much phenytoin (Dilantin) the body absorbs. Taking Indian long pepper along with phenytoin (Dilantin) might increase the effects and side effects of phenytoin (Dilantin).



Propranolol (Inderal)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Indian long pepper might increase how much propranolol (Inderal) the body absorbs. Taking Indian long pepper along with propranolol (Inderal) might increase the effects and side effects of propranolol (Inderal).



Theophylline
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Indian long pepper can increase how much theophylline the body absorbs. Taking theophylline along with Indian long pepper might increase the effects and side effects of theophylline.

Dosing considerations for Indian Long Pepper.

The appropriate dose of Indian long pepper depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Indian long pepper. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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