Hearing Loss: Symptoms & Signs

Hearing loss can be present at birth (congenital) or become evident later in life (acquired deafness). The distinction between acquired and congenital deafness specifies only the time that the deafness appears. It does not specify whether the cause of the deafness is genetic (inherited).

Acquired deafness may or may not be genetic. For example, it may be a manifestation of a delayed-onset form of genetic deafness. Alternatively, acquired deafness may be due to damage to the ear from noise.

Congenital deafness similarly may or may not be genetic. For example, it may be associated with a white forelock and be caused by a genetic disease called Waardenburg syndrome. In fact, more than half of congenital hearing loss is inherited. Alternatively, congenital deafness may be due to something such as the rubella virus to which the mother was exposed during pregnancy.

Related Symptoms & Signs

Other causes of hearing loss

  • Autoimmune Hearing Loss
  • Cogan's Syndrome
  • Jervell & Lange-Nielsen Syndrome
  • Medications (Both Prescription and Nonprescription, Including Aspirin)
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta
  • Waardenburg Syndrome

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Medically Reviewed on 9/10/2019
References
Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.
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