Groin Pain: Symptoms & Signs

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

The groin area is the area where the upper thigh meets the lower abdomen. Pain in the groin area arises from conditions affecting a variety of organs, including musculoskeletal pain or pain related to the male reproductive organs. Groin pain can be acute (sudden in onset), or the pain can persist over time (chronic), depending on the specific cause. As with any pain, the characteristics of groin pain -- its precise location, timing, duration, etc. -- are important to determine the cause. Groin pain can arise due to trauma or injury, tumors, infections, hernias, or other conditions. Pain in the groin can also originate in areas other than the groin, such as the leg. This is known as radiating or referred pain. For example, injury to the muscles or tendons in the leg can cause radiating pain to the groin area.

Muscle strains, bursitis, fractures, and hernias are some common causes of groin pain. In males, inflammation of the testicles or other conditions affecting the testicles and scrotum can cause groin pain.

REFERENCE:

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/15/2018

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