Greater Bindweed

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What other names is Greater Bindweed known by?

Bearbind, Bear's-Bind, Calystegia sepium, Correhuela Mayor, Devil's Vine, Grand Liseron, Hedge Bindweed, Hedge Convolvulus, Hedge Lily, Lady's Nightcap, Liseron des Bois, Liseron des Haies, Old Man's Night Cap, Rutland Beauty.

What is Greater Bindweed?

Greater bindweed is a plant. The powdered root and whole flowering plant are used to make medicine.

Despite safety concerns, people take greater bindweed for treating fever, urinary tract problems, and constipation; and for increasing bile production.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Fever.
  • Urinary tract problems.
  • Constipation.
  • Increasing bile production.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of greater bindweed for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Greater Bindweed work?

People try greater bindweed as a laxative to relieve constipation because it contains substances that can soften stools and increase gut muscle contractions. These effects help move stool through the digestive tract. It's not known how greater bindweed might work as a medicine for other conditions.

Are there safety concerns?

Greater bindweed may be UNSAFE due to its strong laxative effects. Large amounts can cause stomach pain.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It might be UNSAFE to take greater bindweed if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It can act as a strong laxative, and this might be harmful.

Stomach pain or intestinal conditions such as obstruction, appendicitis, colitis, Crohn's disease, or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Don't use greater bindweed if you have any of these conditions. It is a strong laxative and might make your condition worse.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Digoxin (Lanoxin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Greater bindweed is a type of laxative called a stimulant laxative. Stimulant laxatives can decrease potassium levels in the body. Low potassium levels can increase the risk of side effects of digoxin (Lanoxin).



Warfarin (Coumadin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Greater bindweed can work as a laxative. In some people greater bindweed can cause diarrhea. Diarrhea can increase the effects of warfarin and increase the risk of bleeding. If you take warfarin do not to take excessive amounts of greater bindweed.



Water pills (Diuretic drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Greater bindweed is a laxative. Some laxatives can decrease potassium in the body. "Water pills" can also decrease potassium in the body. Taking greater bindweed along with "water pills" might decrease potassium in the body too much.

Some "water pills" that can decrease potassium include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Microzide), and others.

Dosing considerations for Greater Bindweed.

The appropriate dose of greater bindweed depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for greater bindweed. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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