Goldenrod

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What other names is Goldenrod known by?

Aaron's Rod, Baguette d'Aaron, Canadian Goldenrod, Early Goldenrod, European Goldenrod, Gerbe d'Or, Herbe des Juifs, Solidage, Solidage du Canada, Solidago canadensis, Solidago gigantea, Solidago longifolia, Solidago serotina, Solidago virgaurea, Vara de Oro, Verge d'Or, Woundwort.

What is Goldenrod?

Goldenrod is an herb. People use the parts that grow above the ground for medicine.

The names "early goldenrod," "European goldenrod," and "Canadian goldenrod" are used interchangeably. Don't confuse this herb with Verbascum densiflorum, which is sometimes called "goldenrod."

Goldenrod is used to reduce pain and swelling (inflammation), as a diuretic to increase urine flow, and to stop muscle spasms. It is also used for gout, joint pain (rheumatism), arthritis, as well as eczema and other skin conditions. Goldenrod is also used to treat tuberculosis infections that have become active again after a period of inactivity (latency), diabetes, enlargement of the liver, hemorrhoids, internal bleeding, hay fever, asthma, and an enlarged prostate.

Some people use goldenrod as "irrigation therapy." This is a procedure that involves taking goldenrod with lots of fluids to increase urine flow in an effort to treat inflammatory diseases of the lower urinary tract, as well as stones in the kidney or urinary tract.

Goldenrod is used as a mouth rinse for inflammation of the mouth and throat, and it is also applied directly to the skin to improve wound healing.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of goldenrod for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Goldenrod work?

Goldenrod contains chemicals that increase urine flow and have anti-swelling (anti-inflammatory) effects.

Are there safety concerns?

There is not enough information available to know if goldenrod is safe to take for medical conditions.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking goldenrod if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use..

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Goldenrod may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking goldenrod.

Fluid retention (edema) due to heart or kidney conditions: "Irrigation therapy," during which goldenrod is taken with large amounts of fluids to increase urine flow, should not be attempted in people with fluid retention due to heart or kidney disease.

High blood pressure: There is a concern that goldenrod might make the body accumulate more sodium, and this can make high blood pressure worse.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs): Herbal "irrigation therapy" may not work against infections and may require the addition of germ-killing medications. "Irrigation therapy" should be monitored closely. Don't depend on it for clearing up an infection.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Water pills (Diuretic drugs)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Goldenrod seems to work like "water pills" by causing the body to lose water. Taking goldenrod along with other "water pills" might cause the body to lose too much water. Losing too much water can cause you to be dizzy and your blood pressure to go too low.

Some "water pills" include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, Hydrodiuril, Microzide), and others.

Dosing considerations for Goldenrod.

The appropriate dose of goldenrod depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for goldenrod. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
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Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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