fluticasone (Flonase, Flonase Allergy Relief)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

What is fluticasone? How does it work (mechanism of action)?

Fluticasone is a man-made corticosteroid. The exact mechanism of action of fluticasone is not known; however, it stimulates glucocorticoid receptors in humans that produces a potent anti-inflammatory response. Fluticasone also works on multiple cells and mediators that are responsible for the inflammatory symptoms of allergic rhinitis (sneezing, runny nose, etc). The FDA approved fluticasone in October 1994.

What are the uses for fluticasone?

Fluticasone is used for the management of nasal symptoms of seasonal or perennial, allergic and non-allergic rhinitis in adults and children of 4 years of age and older. Safe and effective use of fluticasone has not been established for children under the age of 4.

What are the side effects of fluticasone?

Side effects of fluticasone include:

Some children may experience growth suppression from use of inhaled steroids.

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What is the dosage for fluticasone?

  • Adults: The recommended dosing is 2 sprays per nostril daily. The maximum dose is 200 mcg/day (4 sprays). Maintenance therapy is 1 spray in each nostril daily.
  • Adolescents and children 4 years of age and older: the recommended dosing is 1 spray per nostril daily (total dose 100 mcg.) Patients that do not respond adequately may increase to two sprays in each nostril once a day. The maximum dose is 200 mcg/day.

Which drugs or supplements interact with fluticasone?

Ritonavir (Norvir) and ketoconazole (Nizoral, Extina, Xolegel, Kuric) increase fluticasone levels in the body by delaying its metabolism (elimination). It is not clear how important this effect is.

Is fluticasone safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

There are no adequate studies of fluticasone to determine its safety and effectiveness in pregnant women.

It is not known whether fluticasone enters breast milk; therefore, it is best to be cautious before using it in nursing mothers.

What else should I know about fluticasone?

  • Fluticasone propionate nasal spray is available as a 16 gm bottle, providing a total of 120 sprays. Each spray contains 50 mcg of fluticasone propionate.
  • Fluticasone propionate should be store between 4 C and 30 C (39 F and 86 F).
  • Brand names for fluticasone propionate are Flonase and Flonase Allergy Relief.
  • Flonase is available by prescription and over-the-counter (OTC).

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information.

Summary

Fluticasone propionate nasal spray (Flonase, Flonase Allergy Relief) is a corticosteroid prescribed for the management of symptoms of seasonal or perennial allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. Side effects, drug interactions, dosage, safety during pregnancy, and safety in children should be reviewed prior to taking this medication.

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Reviewed on 11/10/2017
References
Reference: FDA Prescribing Information.

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