European Chestnut

What other names is European Chestnut known by?

Arbre à Pain, Castaneae Folium, Castanea sativa, Castanea vesca, Castanea vulgaris, Castaño, Châtaignier, Châtaignier Commun, Châtaignier Cultivé, Châtaignier Européen, Fagus castanea, Fagus procera, Husked Nut, Jupiter's Nut, Kastanienblaetter, Sardian Nut, Spanish Chestnut, Sweet Chestnut.

What is European Chestnut?

European chestnut is a tree. The leaves are used to make a medicinal tea.

People take European chestnut for breathing problems including bronchitis and whooping cough; and for digestive tract disorders including diarrhea, bloody stools, nausea, and other stomach disorders.

Other uses include treatment of disorders affecting the legs and circulation, fever, infection, swelling, kidney disorders, muscle pain, a connective tissue disorder called sclerosis, and swelling of the lymph nodes due to tuberculosis infection.

People also use European chestnut as a gargle for sore throat. They sometimes apply it directly to the skin for treating wounds.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of European chestnut for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does European Chestnut work?

European chestnut contains chemicals called tannins that might help reduce skin swelling (inflammation) and have a drying (astringent) effect on the tissues.

Are there safety concerns?

European chestnut seems safe for most adults when taken by mouth. There isn't enough information to know whether it can be safely applied to the skin as a medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of European chestnut during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications taken by mouth (Oral drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

European chestnut contains a large amount of chemicals called tannins. Tannins absorb substances in the stomach and intestines. Taking European chestnut along with medications taken by mouth can decrease how much medicine your body absorbs, and decrease the effectiveness of your medicine. To prevent this interaction, take European chestnut at least one hour after medications you take by mouth.

Dosing considerations for European Chestnut.

The appropriate dose of European chestnut depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for European chestnut. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Last Editorial Review: 3/29/2011

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