Clivers

What other names is Clivers known by?

Amor del Hortelano, Amour du Hortelano, Barweed, Bedstraw, Caille-Lait, Catchweed, Cleavers, Cleaverwort, Coachweed, Eriffe, Everlasting Friendship, Gaille, Gaillet Accrochant, Gaillet Gratteron, Gallium, Galium aparine, Glouteron, Goose Grass, Goosebill, Gosling Weed, Grateron, Gratte-Langue, Grip Grass, Hayriffe, Hayruff, Hedge-Burs, Hedgeheriff, Herbe Collante, Love-Man, Mutton Chops, Rièble, Robin-Run-in-the-Grass, Scratchweed, Stick-a-Back, Sweethearts.

What is Clivers?

Clivers is an herb. People use the parts that grow above the ground to make medicine.

Clivers is used to increase urine flow to relieve fluid retention. It is also used for painful urination, enlarged or infected lymph nodes, and a skin condition called psoriasis.

People sometimes apply clivers directly to the skin for ulcers, enlarged glands, breast lumps, and skin rashes.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of clivers for these uses.

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How does Clivers work?

Clivers contains chemicals called tannins that might help reduce skin inflammation and have a drying (astringent) effect on the tissues.

Are there safety concerns?

Clivers is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken appropriately by mouth. There isn't enough information available to know whether clivers is safe when applied to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking clivers if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: There is some concern that the juice that is squeezed out of clivers might affect diabetes. Monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use clivers.

Dosing considerations for Clivers.

The appropriate dose of clivers depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for clivers. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

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Ergun, F., Deliorman, D., Veliolu, A., and Senor, B. Antimicrobial activities of Gallum species. J Fac Pharm 1999;16:7-11.

Lans, C., Turner, N., Khan, T., Brauer, G., and Boepple, W. Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada. J Ethnobiol.Ethnomed. 2007;3:11. View abstract.

Sener, B. and Ergun, F. Isolation and structural studies on the alkaloids of Galium aparine L. GUEDE J Fac Pharm Gazi 1988;5:33-40.

Temizer A. and Sayin F, Ergun F et al. Determination of total flavonoid in various Galium species by differential pulse polarography. J Fac Pharm 1996;13:97-104.

Tierra, M. American Herb Association Quarterly Newsletter 1990;7(2):10.

Tzakou, O., Couladi, M. M., and Philianos, S. Fatty acids and sterols in spring and winter samples of Galium aparine. Fitoterapia 1990;61:93.