Cherokee Rosehip

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What other names is Cherokee Rosehip known by?

Cherokee Rose, Cherokee Rose Musquée, Chinese Rosehip, Fructus Rosae Laevigatae, Jin Yin Zi, Jinyingzi, Rosa camellia, Rosa cherokeensis, Rosa chinensis, Rosa laevigata, Rosa Mosqueta Cherokee, Rosa nivea, Rosa sinica, Rosa ternata, Rosier des Cherokees.

What is Cherokee Rosehip?

Cherokee rosehip is a shrub. People use the fruit to make medicine.

Men use Cherokee rosehip for male sexual problems such as leaking semen and other disorders. Women use it for vaginal discharges and uterine bleeding.

Other uses include treatment of night sweats, frequent urination, bed wetting, ongoing diarrhea, ongoing cough, high blood pressure, and swelling (inflammation) of the intestine (enteritis).

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Male sexual problems.
  • Vaginal discharges.
  • Uterine bleeding.
  • Night sweats.
  • Frequent urination.
  • Bed wetting.
  • Chronic cough.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Intestinal swelling (enteritis).
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Cherokee rosehip for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

How does Cherokee Rosehip work?

Cherokee rosehip contains a large amount of vitamin C (1.5%). This may explain some of its effects.

Are there safety concerns?

Cherokee rosehip appears to be safe for most people when taken at recommended doses. It can cause nausea, stomach cramps, fatigue, and sleeplessness.

Large doses (67 grams of Cherokee rosehip or more per day) can cause diarrhea and symptoms of vitamin C poisoning, such as kidney and urinary tract problems.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It might be UNSAFE to take Cherokee rosehip in large doses if you are pregnant. Prolonged use of large amounts of vitamin C causes the body to speed up the elimination of vitamin C. This might cause vitamin C-deficiency (scurvy) when vitamin C intake is reduced. In a pregnancy situation, this means the newborn might experience scurvy when its vitamin C intake is reduced at birth. Not enough is known about the safety of using smaller amounts of Cherokee rosehip during pregnancy.

There also isn't much information about using Cherokee rosehip during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: The large amount of vitamin C in Cherokee rosehip might affect blood sugar control. Monitor your blood sugar levels closely if you take Cherokee rosehip.

Gout: The large amount of vitamin C in Cherokee rosehip might increase uric acid levels, and this would make gout worse.

Kidney stones: The large amount of vitamin C in Cherokee rosehip might cause more kidney stones to form and make kidney problems worse.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Aluminum
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Aluminum is found in most antacids. Cherokee rosehip contains vitamin C. Vitamin C can increase how much aluminum the body absorbs. But it isn't clear if this interaction is a big concern. Take Cherokee rosehip two hours before, or four hours after, antacids.



Aspirin
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

The body breaks down aspirin to get rid of it. Cherokee rosehip contains large amounts of vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might decrease the breakdown of aspirin. Taking Cherokee rosehip along with aspirin might increase the effects and side effects of aspirin. Do not take large amounts of vitamin C if you take large amounts of aspirin.



Estrogens
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Cherokee rosehip contains a large amount of vitamin C. Vitamin C can increase how much estrogen the body absorbs. Taking Cherokee rosehip along with estrogens can increase the effects and side effects of estrogens.

Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.



Fluphenazine (Prolixin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Cherokee rosehip contains vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might increase how quickly the body gets rid of fluphenazine (Prolixin). Taking Cherokee rosehip along with this might decrease how well fluphenazine works.



Warfarin (Coumadin)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. Cherokee rosehip contains vitamin C. Large amounts of vitamin C might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.



Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate (Trilisate)
Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Cherokee Rosehip contains vitamin C. Vitamin C might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate). But it is not clear if this interaction is a big concern.

Dosing considerations for Cherokee Rosehip.

The appropriate dose of Cherokee rosehip depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Cherokee rosehip. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
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Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

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