Chenopodium Oil

What other names is Chenopodium Oil known by?

Aceite de Paico, Aceite de Quenopodio, Ansérine, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodium anthelminticum, Epazote, Épazote, Fausse Ambroisie, Huile d'Ansérine, Huile de Chénopode, Jesuit Tea, Mexican Tea, Thé du Mexique.

What is Chenopodium Oil?

Chenopodium is an herb. Oil made from this herb is used as medicine. Authorities disagree on whether chenopodium oil is the oil of fresh, flowering, and fruiting parts of the plant or seed oil.

Despite serious safety concerns, people take chenopodium oil to kill roundworms and hookworms in the intestine.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Treating intestinal worms.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of chenopodium oil for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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How does Chenopodium Oil work?

Chenopodium oil appears to work by paralyzing worms in the intestine.

Are there safety concerns?

Chenopodium oil is UNSAFE.

Chenopodium oil contains the chemical ascaridole, which is very toxic. It can irritate the skin, mouth, throat, and lining of the stomach and intestines. It can also cause vomiting, headache, dizziness, kidney and liver damage, temporary deafness, convulsions, paralysis, and death. Chenopodium oil can explode if heated or mixed with acids.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE for anyone, especially pregnant or breast-feeding women, to take chenopodium oil. It contains poisonous chemicals.

Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Chenopodium oil might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking chenopodium oil along with medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.

Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

Dosing considerations for Chenopodium Oil.

The appropriate dose of chenopodium oil depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for chenopodium oil. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Last Editorial Review: 3/29/2011

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