What is a miscarriage?

?Your body may require anywhere from a few weeks to over a month to recover from a miscarriage. The pregnancy hormones remain in your blood for up to two months. You should expect to get your period four to six weeks after miscarriage.
‌Your body may require anywhere from a few weeks to over a month to recover from a miscarriage. The pregnancy hormones remain in your blood for up to two months. You should expect to get your period four to six weeks after miscarriage.

A miscarriage can be a stressful experience for a mother-to-be. Worrying about getting pregnant after a miscarriage is natural. But you can go on to have a successful pregnancy once you emotionally and physically recover.

‌A miscarriage is the sudden loss of your baby before the 20th week of pregnancy. It is also called spontaneous abortion or pregnancy loss. Miscarriages can occur when your baby isn’t developing properly.

On average, one out of five pregnancies ends in a miscarriage. It's not uncommon for women to have a pregnancy loss before they even find out they are pregnant.

Causes of miscarriage

Up to 50% of miscarriages occur because of problems in your baby's chromosomes while it grows in your womb. This becomes more common as your age progresses. 

Factors that can increase the risk of a miscarriage include the following:

After a miscarriage

When you have a pregnancy loss, your doctor will confirm it by examining your pelvis using ultrasound. If your pregnancy loss occurs in the first trimester and your uterus doesn’t have any fetal tissue, you won’t need any treatment.

But, if your uterus has fetal tissue, your doctor will remove it using the following methods:

  • Medication to stimulate your uterus to expel the remaining fetal tissue
  • Dilation and curettage, which involves dilating your cervix and scraping off the uterine lining
  • Dilation and extraction, which uses suction to remove fetal tissue from your uterus

These medical procedures are performed under anesthesia and may cause cramps or bleeding.

Recovery time

Your body may require anywhere from a few weeks to over a month to recover from a miscarriage. The pregnancy hormones remain in your blood for up to two months. You should expect to get your period four to six weeks after miscarriage.

The best time for getting pregnant after miscarriage

Apart from physical weakness, a miscarriage can leave you with feelings of loss, grief, anxiety, or guilt. Take time to heal and recover completely before planning pregnancy again.

Once you feel you are ready, check with your doctor to find out whether you need to undergo any tests before trying again. Your doctor may recommend waiting for some time after a miscarriage as you can get pregnant only after you start ovulating again.

Research suggests that you can try for another pregnancy within three months of a miscarriage.

Chances of another miscarriage

Women who have a miscarriage often worry that it will reoccur. A miscarriage can be a one-off incident and is not necessarily a sign of future miscarriage risk.

Research has shown that almost 85% of women have a healthy pregnancy after a miscarriage. In fact, 75% of women with two or three miscarriages go on to have successful pregnancies.

One in five women may experience another miscarriage. This means that your chances of having another pregnancy loss are low. But if you experience three or more miscarriages, you may have to visit a fertility specialist.

Tests before getting pregnant after miscarriage

If you have two or more miscarriages, your doctor may recommend the following tests to detect the underlying causes:

  • Blood and urine tests to check your hormone levels and your immune system
  • Genetic tests to check your chromosomes
  • Ultrasound or hysteroscopy to identify uterine problems
  • Magnetic resonance imaging to check your uterus

If your doctor identifies a problem, they may suggest medicines or treatment so you can get pregnant again.

SLIDESHOW

Stages of Pregnancy: Week by Week See Slideshow

Increasing the chances of a successful pregnancy

You may not be able to prevent a miscarriage from happening, but you can choose a healthy lifestyle for you and your baby’s well-being. You can do the following to increase your chances of getting pregnant again:‌

  • Eat nutritious food.
  • Take prenatal vitamins and folic acid and calcium supplements regularly.
  • Avoid having caffeine, drinking alcohol, smoking, and using marijuana or illegal drugs.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise regularly as recommended by your doctor.
  • Avoid uncooked foods that could cause infections like listeriosis.
  • Consult with your doctor before taking any medications.
  • Avoid strenuous activities that could lead to abdominal distress.
  • Get immunized to prevent infectious diseases.
  • Learn about your family’s medical or genetic history.
  • Don’t skip any prenatal visits.
  • Call your doctor immediately if you feel sick, start cramping or bleeding, or notice that your baby’s movements have decreased.

You may want to consult a specialist if you:

  • Experience two or more miscarriages
  • Are more than 35 years old
  • Have health conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Have fertility problems

Final thoughts

‌If you have experienced a miscarriage, talk about your feelings to your partner, family, or friends to process your emotions. Consult your doctor or a counselor for extra support if you have trouble managing your physical or emotional health.

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Medically Reviewed on 9/13/2021
References
American Pregnancy ASSOCIATION: “Pregnancy After Miscarriage.”

KidsHealth: “Miscarriages.”

MARCH OF DIMES: “MISCARRIAGE.”

Obstetrics & Gynecology: “Trying to Conceive After an Early Pregnancy Loss: An Assessment on How Long Couples Should Wait.”

pregnancybirth&baby: “Your health after a miscarriage.”