Can you still have Hashimoto's disease without thyroid?

Hashimoto's disease is a thyroid condition that causes the formation of antibodies that attack the thyroid gland. Thyroidectomy reduces thyroid antibody titers by an average of 92 percent, so the symptoms of Hashimoto's go away without a thyroid gland.
Hashimoto's disease is a thyroid condition that causes the formation of antibodies that attack the thyroid gland. Thyroidectomy reduces thyroid antibody titers by an average of 92 percent, so the symptoms of Hashimoto's go away without a thyroid gland.

Hashimoto’s thyroid is a long-standing condition where the body produces damaging proteins against its thyroid gland.

These proteins produce symptoms such as irritability, body ache, weakness, dryness of mouth and joint ache. In some patients, these symptoms may persist despite medical therapy, which normalizes the thyroid hormone levels. The symptoms are due to the overstimulated immune system that affects other body cells and the thyroid gland. Many studies have proven that these symptoms can be managed with total thyroidectomy.

Thyroidectomy normalizes anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibody titers, reducing these by an average of 92 percent, thus providing symptom relief. Therefore, there is a 92 percent chance that the symptoms will lessen once the thyroid is removed. You will not exhibit symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease without a thyroid gland.

Complete removal of the antigenic tissue through total thyroidectomy has been hypothesized to control general autoimmune response and relieve symptoms.

What is Hashimoto’s disease?

Hashimoto’s disease is also known as autoimmune chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, autoimmune thyroiditis, or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. This is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system misidentifies and attacks its thyroid gland. This leads to an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) and ill effects on the body.

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland at the front of your neck that produces two chemical substances (hormones): thyroxine (also called T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). These hormones travel through the bloodstream and control various functions of the body and use energy (metabolism). It also controls in utero growth. Hence, it is prudent to diagnose thyroid abnormality in a pregnant woman. The undiagnosed thyroid problem in the mother may cause mental retardation, poor muscle and bone development and poor dentition in the child. The child may also develop prolonged jaundice of birth.

Hashimoto’s disease may be due to genetic and environmental factors.

Risk factors for Hashimoto’s disease are as follows

What are the symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease?

Hashimoto’s disease is often used interchangeably with hypothyroidism. It is one of the causes of hypothyroidism. The symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease are as follows

It is possible to have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis for years without experiencing any signs or symptoms. However, primarily, this disease is associated with thyroid swelling (goiter) and an underactive thyroid.

What are the complications of thyroidectomy?

Thyroidectomy is major surgery. It is performed under general or regional anesthesia. Like every procedure, it has potential complications.

Complications of thyroidectomy may include

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Damage to the parathyroid gland (a neck gland that regulates calcium in the body)
  • Underactive thyroid
  • Airway obstruction
  • Permanent hoarse voice due to nerve damage

SLIDESHOW

Hyperthyroidism: Symptoms, Treatment, Medication See Slideshow

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Medically Reviewed on 1/26/2021
References
Medscape Medical Reference

Annals of Internal Medicine


Endocrine Today



ClinicalTrials.gov



Mayo Clinic



National Institutes of Health NIDDK



Endocrine Society



American Thyroid Association