Buchu

What other names is Buchu known by?

Agathosma betulina, Agathosma crenulata, Agathosma serratifolia, Barosma betulina, Barosma crenulata, Barosmae folium, Barosma serratifolia, Bookoo, Bucco, Buccu, Bucku, Bukku, Diosma, Diosma crenulata, Diosma serratifolia, Hartogia betulin, Parapetalifera betulina, Parapetalifera crenulata, Parapetalifera odorata, Parapetalifera serrata, Parapetalifera serratifolia, Round Buchu, Short Buch.

What is Buchu?

Buchu is a plant. The leaf is used to make medicine.

Buchu is used to disinfect the urinary tract during infections of the bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis), prostate (prostatitis), or kidney (pyelonephritis). It is also used to treat sexually transmitted diseases.

In manufacturing, the oil from buchu is used to give a fruit flavor (often black currant) to foods.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of buchu for these uses.

How does Buchu work?

It is thought that the active chemicals in buchu may kill germs and also promote urine flow.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Are there safety concerns?

Buchu is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts and is POSSIBLY SAFE when used appropriately in medicinal amounts. But it is POSSIBLY UNSAFE in larger amounts and when the oil is consumed. Buchu may irritate the stomach and kidneys and increase menstrual flow. It may also cause liver damage, so liver function in people who use buchu should be monitored by a healthcare provider.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don't use buchu in amounts that are larger than usual food amounts if you are pregnant. Buchu is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken during pregnancy. There have been reports linking buchu to miscarriages.

If you are breast-feeding, buchu is POSSIBLY SAFE in food amounts, but don't take larger amounts. Not enough is known about the safety of buchu during breast-feeding.

Bleeding disorders: Buchu might slow blood clotting and increase bleeding. In theory, buchu might make bleeding disorders worse.

Kidney infections: Even though some people use buchu for kidney infections, health experts advise against this.

Urinary tract inflammation: Don't use buchu if you have pain and swelling in the urinary tract.

Surgery: Buchu might slow blood clotting. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using buchu at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Are there any interactions with medications?


LithiumInteraction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Buchu might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking buchu might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.


Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Buchu might slow blood clotting. Taking buchu along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing considerations for Buchu.

The appropriate dose of buchu depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for buchu. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

El Shafae, A. M. and El Domiaty, M. M. Improved LC methods for the determination of diosmin and/or hesperidin in plant extracts and pharmaceutical formulations. J Pharm Biomed.Anal. 2001;26(4):539-545. View abstract.

Ernst E. Interactions between synthetic and herbal medicinal products Part 1: a systematic review of the indirect evidence. Perfusion 2000;13:4-15.

Lis-Balchin, M., Hart, S., and Simpson, E. Buchu (Agathosma betulina and A. crenulata, Rutaceae) essential oils: their pharmacological action on guinea-pig ileum and antimicrobial activity on microorganisms. J Pharm.Pharmacol. 2001;53(4):579-582. View abstract.

Sim, M. J., Choi, D. R., and Ahn, Y. J. Vapor phase toxicity of plant essential oils to Cadra cautella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). J Econ Entomol. 2006;99(2):593-598. View abstract.

Simpson, D. Buchu--South Africa's amazing herbal remedy. Scott.Med J 1998;43(6):189-191. View abstract.

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182

Fetrow CW, Avila JR. Professional's Handbook of Complementary & Alternative Medicines. 1st ed. Springhouse, PA: Springhouse Corp., 1999.