Bloody Sputum (Hemoptysis): Symptoms & Signs

  • Medical Author:
    William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

    Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Medically Reviewed on 9/10/2019

Bloody sputum (coughing up blood or bloody mucus or hemoptysis) can come from common forms of infection in the lungs and airways, such as acute bronchitis or pneumonia. Bloody sputum can be a result of lung cancer. Whenever bloody sputum is present and cannot be attributed to a curable condition, a complete lung evaluation is warranted. Bloody sputum is also referred to as hemoptysis.

Causes of bloody sputum include lung infection with pneumonia, bronchitis, tuberculosis, parasites (hookworm), cystic fibrosis, nosebleed (epistaxis), pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, chest trauma, mitral stenosis, lung cancer, and Goodpasture syndrome.

Related Symptoms & Signs

Other causes of bloody sputum

  • Bleeding Disorder Including Anticoagulant Therapy
  • Bronchial Adenoma
  • Foreign Body Material in the Lung
  • Fungus Infection of the Lung Such as Coccidiomycosis, Blastomycosis
  • Goodpasture Syndrome
  • Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis
  • Lung Abscess
  • Mitral Stenosis
  • Parasites Including Paragonimus westermani
  • Rare Lung Tumors
  • Trauma to the Lung

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

Next Article

Subscribe to MedicineNet's General Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

Medically Reviewed on 9/10/2019
References
Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.