Blackberry

What other names is Blackberry known by?

Black Berry, Bramble, Dewberry, Feuilles de Mûrier, Feuilles de Ronce, Goutberry, Mûre, Mûre Sauvage, Mûrier, Ronce du Canada, Ronce Commune, Ronce Laciniée, Rubi Fruticosi Folium, Rubi Fruticosi Radix, Rubus affinis, Rubus canadensis, Rubus fruticosus, Rubus laciniatus, Rubus millspaughii, Rubus plicatus, Thimbleberry, Zarzamora.

What is Blackberry?

Blackberry is a plant. The leaf, root, and fruit (berry) are used to make medicine.

Blackberry is used for treating diarrhea, fluid retention, diabetes, gout, and pain and swelling (inflammation); and for preventing cancer and heart disease.

It is also used as a mouth rinse for mild mouth and throat irritation.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Fluid retention.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of blackberry for these uses.

How does Blackberry work?

Blackberry contains chemicals that might have antioxidant effects. It also contains chemicals that might protect against cancer.

Are there safety concerns?

Blackberry is safe in amounts used as food. There isn't enough information available to know if blackberry is safe in the larger amounts used as medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of blackberry during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for Blackberry.

The appropriate dose of blackberry for use as treatment depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for blackberry. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

CONTINUE SCROLLING FOR RELATED SLIDESHOW

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors

Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Blomhoff, R. [Antioxidants and oxidative stress]. Tidsskr.Nor Laegeforen. 6-17-2004;124(12):1643-1645. View abstract.

Carmen Ramirez-Tortosa, M., Garcia-Alonso, J., Luisa Vidal-Guevara, M., Quiles, J. L., Jesus, Periago M., Linde, J., Dolores, Mesa M., Ros, G., Abellan, P., and Gil, A. Oxidative stress status in an institutionalised elderly group after the intake of a phenolic-rich dessert. Br J Nutr 2004;91(6):943-950. View abstract.

Ding, M., Feng, R., Wang, S. Y., Bowman, L., Lu, Y., Qian, Y., Castranova, V., Jiang, B. H., and Shi, X. Cyanidin-3-glucoside, a natural product derived from blackberry, exhibits chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity. J Biol Chem 6-23-2006;281(25):17359-17368. View abstract.

Felgines, C., Talavera, S., Texier, O., Gil-Izquierdo, A., Lamaison, J. L., and Remesy, C. Blackberry anthocyanins are mainly recovered from urine as methylated and glucuronidated conjugates in humans. J Agric.Food Chem 10-5-2005;53(20):7721-7727. View abstract.

Halvorsen, B. L., Holte, K., Myhrstad, M. C., Barikmo, I., Hvattum, E., Remberg, S. F., Wold, A. B., Haffner, K., Baugerod, H., Andersen, L. F., Moskaug, O., Jacobs, D. R., Jr., and Blomhoff, R. A systematic screening of total antioxidants in dietary plants. J Nutr 2002;132(3):461-471. View abstract.

Netzel, M., Strass, G., Janssen, M., Bitsch, I., and Bitsch, R. Bioactive anthocyanins detected in human urine after ingestion of blackcurrant juice. J Environ.Pathol Toxicol Oncol 2001;20(2):89-95. View abstract.

Pellegrini, N., Serafini, M., Colombi, B., Del Rio, D., Salvatore, S., Bianchi, M., and Brighenti, F. Total antioxidant capacity of plant foods, beverages and oils consumed in Italy assessed by three different in vitro assays. J Nutr 2003;133(9):2812-2819. View abstract.

Tournas, V. H. and Katsoudas, E. Mould and yeast flora in fresh berries, grapes and citrus fruits. Int J Food Microbiol. 11-15-2005;105(1):11-17. View abstract.

Wang, Y., Finn, C., and Qian, M. C. Impact of growing environment on chickasaw blackberry (Rubus L.) aroma evaluated by gas chromatography olfactometry dilution analysis. J Agric.Food Chem 5-4-2005;53(9):3563-3571. View abstract.

Yang, D. J., Krishnan, R. S., Guillen, D. R., Schmiege, L. M., III, Leis, P. F., and Hsu, S. Disseminated sporotrichosis mimicking sarcoidosis. Int J Dermatol 2006;45(4):450-453. View abstract.

Alonso R, Cadavid I, Calleja JM. A preliminary study of hypoglycemic activity of Rubus fruticosus. Planta Med 1980;Suppl:102-6.. View abstract.

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182

Feng R, Bowman LL, Lu Y, et al. Blackberry extracts inhibit activating protein 1 activation and cell transformation by perturbing the mitogenic signaling pathway. Nutr Cancer 2004;50:80-9. . View abstract.

Ivanovska N, Philipov S. Study on the anti-inflammatory action of Berberis vulgaris root extract, alkaloid fractions and pure alkaloids. Int J Immunopharmacol 1996;18:553-61. View abstract.

Rossi A, Serraino I, Dugo P, et al. Protective effects of anthocyanins from blackberry in a rat model of acute lung inflammation. Free Radic Res 2003;37:891-900.. View abstract.

Sauebin L, Rossi A, Serraino I, et al. Effect of anthocyanins contained in a blackberry extract on the circulatory failure and multiple organ dysfunction caused by endotoxin in the rat. Planta Med 2004;70:745-52. . View abstract.

Serraino I, Dugo L, Dugo P, et al. Protective effects of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside from blackberry extract against peroxynitrite-induced endothelial dysfunction and vascular failure. Life Sci 2003;73:1097-114.. View abstract.

Siriwoharn T, Wrolstad RE, Finn CE, Pereira CB. Et al. Influence of cultivar, maturity, and sampling on blackberry (Rubus L. Hybrids) anthocyanins, polyphenolics, and antioxidant properties. J Agric Food Chem 2004;52:8021-30. . View abstract.

Swanston-Flatt SK, Day C, Bailey CJ, Flatt PR. Traditional plant treatments for diabetes. Studies in normal and streptozotocin diabetic mice. Diabetologia 1990;33:462-4. View abstract.

Wada L, Ou B. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of Oregon caneberries. J Agric Food Chem 2002;50:3495-500.. View abstract.

Wang SY, Jiao H. Scavenging capacity of berry crops on superoxide radicals, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and singlet oxygen. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:5677-84.. View abstract.

Wang SY, Lin HS. Antioxidant activity in fruits and leaves of blackberry, raspberry, and strawberry varies with cultivar and developmental stage. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:140-6.. View abstract.