Black Nightshade

View Slideshow Pictures

What other names is Black Nightshade known by?

Crève-Chien, Garden Nightshade, Herbe à Gale, Herbe aux Magiciens, Herbe Maure, Houndsberry, Kakamachi, Kakmachi, Long Kui, Makoi, Morelle Noire, Myrtille de Jardin, Petty Morel, Poisonberry, Raisin de Loup, Solanum nigrum, Tomate du Diable, Tue-Chien, Yerba Mora.

What is Black Nightshade?

Black nightshade is a plant. Originally, black nightshade was called "petit (small) morel" to distinguish it from the more poisonous species, deadly nightshade, that is known as "great morel." You may hear black nightshade mistakenly referred to as "petty" morel, instead of the correct term, "petit" moral. People use the whole black nightshade plant including leaves, fruit, and root to make medicine.

Despite serious safety concerns, black nightshade has been used for stomach irritation, cramps, spasms, pain, and nervousness.

Some people apply black nightshade directly to the skin for a skin condition called psoriasis, hemorrhoids, and deep skin infections (abscesses). The bruised, fresh leaves are put on the skin to treat swelling (inflammation), burns, and ulcers.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Stomach irritation.
  • Cramps.
  • Spasms.
  • Pain.
  • Nervousness.
  • Hemorrhoids, when applied to the skin.
  • Skin inflammation, when applied to the skin.
  • Burns, when applied to the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of black nightshade for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

Quick GuideVitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough?

How does Black Nightshade work?

There isn't enough information to know how black nightshade might work as a medicine.

Are there safety concerns?

Black nightshade is UNSAFE to take by mouth. It contains a toxic chemical called solanin. At lower doses, it can cause nausea, vomiting, headache, and other side effects. At higher doses, it can cause severe poisoning. Signs of poisoning include irregular heartbeat, trouble breathing, dizziness, drowsiness, twitching of the arms and legs, cramps, diarrhea, paralysis, coma, and death.

There isn't enough information to know whether it is safe to apply black nightshade directly to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE to take black nightshade if you are pregnant. It might cause birth defects.

Dosing considerations for Black Nightshade.

The appropriate dose of black nightshade depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for black nightshade. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 3/29/2011 12:35:40 PM

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors