atropine (oral, Atreza, Sal-Tropine - discontinued in the US)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Facts

What is atropine-oral, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Atropine belongs to a class of medications known as anticholinergics or antimuscarinics. Atropine occurs naturally and is extracted from the belladonna alkaloid plant. Atropine works by blocking the actions of a chemical called acetylcholine. Atropine has numerous uses in clinical medicine and is available in several dosage forms including oral tablet, solution for injection, ophthalmic solution, and ophthalmic ointment. Oral atropine is no longer available in the US.

Atropine produces many effects in the body, including reducing stomach or intestinal spasms, reducing the production of saliva, mucus, and other bodily secretions, and maintaining proper heart rhythm.

Is atropine-oral available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: No longer available

Do I need a prescription for atropine-oral?

No longer available

What are the side effects of atropine-oral?

WARNING

  • Atropine may cause drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision. Use caution when operating machinery or performing other hazardous activities.
  • Alcohol consumption may increase dizziness or drowsiness while taking atropine.
  • Atropine should not be used by people with narrow angle glaucoma.

Quick GuideIBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment

IBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment

What is the dosage for atropine-oral?

The recommended dose is 0.4 mg every 4 to 6 hours as needed.

Which drugs or supplements interact with atropine-oral?

Combining atropine with other anticholinergic drugs increases the risk of side effects. Examples of such drugs include

Is atropine-oral safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of atropine in pregnant women.

A small amount of atropine is secreted in human milk. Atropine should be used cautiously while breastfeeding.

What else should I know about atropine-oral?

What preparations of atropine-oral are available?

Oral tablets: 0.4 mg

How should I keep atropine-oral stored?

Atropine tablets should be stored at room temperature, between 15 C and 30 C (59 F and 86 F).

REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information

Quick GuideIBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment

IBS - Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment

Summary

Atropine oral (Atreza, Sal-Tropine) is no longer available in the United States. Oral atropine is a drug that belongs to a class of medications referred to as anticholinergics. Atropine is prescribed to treat people with sialorrhea (production of excess saliva), reducing stomach or intestinal spasms, reducing mucus production other secretions of the body, and maintaining proper heart rhythm. Side effects, drug interactions, dosing, storage, and pregnancy and breastfeeding safety information should be reviewed prior to taking any medication.

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Reviewed on 10/15/2015
References
REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information

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