What Kind of Candy Can You Eat With Diabetes?

  • Medical Author:
    Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C)

    Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Better Blood Sugar Balance

Ask the experts

I have diabetes. If I want to eat a candy bar, for example, is there a way to calculate how much insulin I could take to knock out the sugar in the candy bar?

Doctor's response

Well, the correct answer is that a person with diabetes really is not restricted to eating certain foods, so while a candy bar may not be the best choice nutritionally, an occasional indulgence is understandable. A candy bar usually has about 220-250 calories and somewhere between 25-30 grams of carbohydrates. On average, most patients with diabetes require one unit of insulin for every 10-15 grams of carbohydrates they eat. So you could try two units of a short acting insulin and see how you do. However, it is really important that you meet with a diabetes educator/nutritionist to see what your insulin ratios are, and what your sensitivity is. You should not consider insulin an option to "knock out" the sugar in the candy bar. It is more complicated than that. The type of carbohydrate, what it is combined with, and what your glucose level is before you start eating are all factors to be considered. I would strongly suggest you meet with a diabetes educator/nutritionist or your physician before you move ahead and adjust any insulin doses by yourself.

Medically reviewed by John A. Daller, MD; American Board of Surgery with subspecialty certification in surgical critical care

REFERENCE:

"Nutritional considerations in type 2 diabetes mellitus"
UpToDate.com


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Reviewed on 6/6/2017

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