anamu

Medically Reviewed on 9/27/2022

Generic Name: anamu

Other Names: apacin, apazote de zorro, aposin, calcauchin, chasser vermine, Congo Root, douvant douvant, emeruaiuma, guinea hen leaf, guinea henweed, gully root, heuvo de gato, hierba de las gallinitas, kuan, kudjuruk, lemtewei, lemuru, mal pouri, mapurit, mucura, ocano, payche, Petiveria alliacea, verbena hedionda, verveine puante, zorillo

Drug Class: Herbals

What is anamu, and what is it used for?

Anamu is a perennial herb, Petiveria alliacea, that grows in South and Central America, southeastern United States, and some parts of Africa.

The leaves, stems, and roots of anamu have been traditionally taken as tea or tincture to treat infections, headaches, fever, and cold. It is topically applied for skin fungal infections and to heal cuts and wounds. Anamu is available over the counter in the U.S. as dried roots and leaves, and as extracts in capsules and tablet forms.

Laboratory studies indicate anamu may have anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiviral, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antispasmodic, and analgesic effects. Anamu is also believed to have anxiety, blood pressure, and blood sugar-reducing properties. There are, however, inadequate scientific studies to support its uses.

The therapeutic effect of anamu is likely from the compounds it contains such as dibenzyl trisulphide, flavonoids and several sulfur-containing amino acids which give it a garlic-like smell. In vitro studies show that dibenzyl trisulphide has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects, and may inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Anamu extracts also exhibited antifungal and antibacterial activities in the studies. Suggested uses of anamu include:

Warnings

  • Do not take anamu if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Avoid taking anamu if you have an increased tendency to bleed or bruise easily (bleeding diathesis), or if you are on blood thinning medications (anticoagulants).
  • Use with caution if you have diabetes mellitus and are taking anti-diabetic medications, anamu may further lower blood glucose levels and cause hypoglycemia.
  • Anamu can reduce blood pressure, use with caution if you are taking anti-hypertensive medications.

What are the side effects of anamu?

There is insufficient information on side effects of anamu. Side effects of anamu may include:

Call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms or serious side effects while using this drug:

This is not a complete list of all side effects or adverse reactions that may occur from the use of this drug. Call your doctor for medical advice about serious side effects or adverse reactions. You may also report side effects or health problems to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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What are the dosages of anamu?

There is insufficient information on what might be appropriate dosages of anamu, follow manufacturer’s instructions.

Suggested dosage:

  • 1000-1500 mg orally twice daily or as directed by manufacturer

Overdose

  • There is no information on anamu overdose.
  • Some reports suggest that high doses may cause sweating and drowsiness.
  • Report to Poison Control if you experience any symptoms from anamu overdose.

What drugs interact with anamu?

Inform your doctor of all medications you are currently taking, who can advise you on any possible drug interactions. Never begin taking, suddenly discontinue, or change the dosage of any medication without your doctor’s recommendation.

  • Anamu has no severe or serious interactions with other drugs.
  • Moderate interactions of anamu include:
    • antithrombin alfa
    • antithrombin III
    • argatroban
    • bemiparin
    • bivalirudin
    • dabigatran
    • dalteparin
    • enoxaparin
    • fondaparinux
    • heparin
    • phenindione
    • protamine
    • reteplase
    • tenecteplase
  • Anamu has mild interactions with at least 80 different drugs.

The drug interactions listed above are not all of the possible interactions or adverse effects. For more information on drug interactions, visit the RxList Drug Interaction Checker.

It is important to always tell your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider of all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use, as well as the dosage for each, and keep a list of the information. Check with your doctor or health care provider if you have any questions about the medication.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding

  • Anamu may induce uterine contractions and cause miscarriage. Do not use if you are pregnant.
  • There is no information whether anamu is excreted in breast milk, or on its effect on milk production or the breastfed infant. Avoid use if you are breastfeeding.
  • Never use any herbal product including anamu if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, without first checking with your healthcare provider.

What else should I know about anamu?

  • Anamu is possibly safe for most adults in recommended doses for a short period.
  • Check with your healthcare provider before taking any herbal supplement, including anamu.
  • Take anamu exactly as per label instructions.
  • Herbal products often contain many ingredients. Check labels for the components in the anamu product you choose.
  • Anamu is marketed as an herbal supplement and is not regulated by the FDA. Products may differ in formulations and strengths, and labels may not always match contents; exercise caution in choosing your product.
  • Store safely out of reach of children.

Summary

The leaves, stems, and roots of anamu have been traditionally taken as tea or tincture to treat infections, headaches, fever, and cold. It is topically applied for skin fungal infections and to heal cuts and wounds. Do not take anamu if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Avoid taking anamu if you have an increased tendency to bleed or bruise easily (bleeding diathesis), or if you are on blood thinning medications (anticoagulants). Use with caution if you have diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes). Side effects of anamu may include low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and low blood pressure (hypotension).

Treatment & Diagnosis

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Medically Reviewed on 9/27/2022
References
REFERENCES:

https://www.rxlist.com/consumer_anamu/drugs-condition.htm

https://reference.medscape.com/drug/apacin-apazote-de-zorro-anamu-344455

https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/petiveria-alliacea

https://www.herbrally.com/monographs/anamu

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378874116300952

https://www.medicinenet.com/what_is_anamu_herb_good_for/article.htm