amikacin sulfate, Amikin (discontinued)

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Bacterial Infections 101 Pictures Slideshow

What is amikacin injection, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Amikacin is a man-made aminoglycoside antibiotic. It is similar to tobramycin and gentamicin. Amikacin binds to components of bacteria that produce important bacterial proteins, blocking protein synthesis which eventually leads to stopping further bacterial growth. Amikacin is used to treat infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin. Amikacin treats infections caused by gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas species, Escherichia coli, Providencia species, Indole-positive and indole-negative Proteus species, Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia species, and Acinetobacter. Amikacin is also used in certain staphylococcal infections as well.

Is amikacin injection available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: Yes

Do I need a prescription for amikacin injection?

Yes

What are the side effects of amikacin injection?

Side effects of Amikacin are:

Amikacin carries a boxed warning of loss of hearing and kidney dysfunction for individuals treated with high doses or for longer periods.

Quick GuideSymptoms of Mono: Infectious Mononucleosis Treatment

Symptoms of Mono: Infectious Mononucleosis Treatment

What is the dosage for amikacin injection?

The recommended dose for adults, children, and older infants with normal kidney function is 15 mg/kg/day divided into 2 or 3 doses; for example, 7.5 mg/kg every 12 hours or 5 mg/kg every 8 hours.

The duration of treatment is usually 7 to 10 days.

Which drugs or supplements interact with amikacin injection?

Amikacin should not be used with amphotericin due to significant risk of loss of hearing and severe kidney dysfunction.

Amikacin should be used with great caution with medications like furosemide (Lasix), torsemide (Demadex), cyclosporine, and tacrolimus (Prograf) due to high risk of loss of hearing and kidney dysfunction.

Is amikacin injection safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

Amikacin is harmful to the fetus and should not be used during pregnancy unless there are not safer options.

It is not known whether Amikacin enters breast milk; therefore, it is best to be cautious before using it while breastfeeding.

What else should I know about amikacin injection?

What preparations of amikacin injection are available?

Amikacin sulfate injection is colorless solution. It is available in 50 mg/ml and 250 mg/ml strengths in 2 ml vials. It is also available in 250 mg/ml strength in 4 ml vials.

How should I keep amikacin injection stored?

Store Amikacin at room temperature between 20 C to 25 C (68 F to 77 F).

REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information

Quick GuideSymptoms of Mono: Infectious Mononucleosis Treatment

Symptoms of Mono: Infectious Mononucleosis Treatment

Summary

Amikacin sulfate (Amikin) is an antibiotic injection prescribed to treat bacterial meningitis, infected burns, cystic fibrosis, and severe UTI infections. Side effects, drug interactions, dosage, storage, and pregnancy safety information should be reviewed prior to using this medication.

Treatment & Diagnosis

Medications & Supplements

Prevention & Wellness

Subscribe to MedicineNet's General Health Newsletter

By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time.

FDA Logo

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Reviewed on 9/28/2015
References
REFERENCE: FDA Prescribing Information

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors