abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine, Trizivir

  • Pharmacy Author:
    Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD

    Dr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99.

  • Medical and Pharmacy Editor: Jay W. Marks, MD
    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD

    Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

HIV/AIDS Myths and Facts

What is abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Trizivir is a combination oral medication that is used for treating infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Trizivir contains abacavir (Ziagen), lamivudine (Epivir) and zidovudine (Retrovir), which are three different anti-HIV drugs with different mechanisms of action. Anti-HIV drugs are often used in combination to increase HIV suppression and to reduce the chance of the HIV developing resistance to any single drug. Combining these three drugs into one pill reduces the number of individual medications that a patient has to take, which makes it easier for patients to comply with therapy. Administration of one tablet of Trizivir is equal to giving 300 mg of abacavir, 150 mg of lamivudine and 300 mg of zidovudine together. Trizivir does not reduce the transmission of HIV among individuals, and it does not cure HIV or AIDS. Trizivir was approved by the FDA in November 2000.

What brand names are available for abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine?

Trizivir

Is abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine available as a generic drug?

GENERIC AVAILABLE: No.

Do I need a prescription for abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine?

Yes.

What are the side effects of abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine?

Trizivir causes the same side effect as its component drugs, abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine. The most common side effects are:

Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions involving several organs have been associated with abacavir, a component of Trizivir. Symptoms include fever, rash, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, aches, shortness of breath, cough, and sore throat. Patients should discontinue Trizivir if a hypersensitivity reaction is suspected. Patients who carry a certain genetic marker called HLA-B 5701 are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir. Screening for the HLA-B 5701 allele is recommended prior to initiating therapy with abacavir.

Other important side effects of the abacavir component include:

Quick GuideHIV AIDS Facts: Symptoms and Treatments

HIV AIDS Facts: Symptoms and Treatments

What is the dosage for abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine?

The recommended dose for adults and adolescents is one tablet twice daily.

Is abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

Use of Trizivir by nursing women has not been adequately studied. Nevertheless, HIV-infected mothers should not breastfeed because of the potential risk of transmitting HIV to an infant that is not infected.

What else should I know about abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine?

What preparations of abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine are available?

Tablets: 300 mg abacavir/150 mg lamivudine/300 mg zidovudine.

How should I keep abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine stored?

Capsules and powder should be stored at room temperature, 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).

Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

Quick GuideHIV AIDS Facts: Symptoms and Treatments

HIV AIDS Facts: Symptoms and Treatments

Summary

Abacavir, lamivudine, zidovudine (Trizivir) is a combination drug prescribed to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. Side effects, drug interactions, dosage, and pregnancy information should be reviewed prior to taking this medication.

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Reviewed on 6/10/2015
References
Reference: FDA Prescribing Information

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