7 Home Remedies That Can Help Relieve Acid Reflux

Medically Reviewed on 3/5/2021

What is acid reflux?

Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), happens when stomach acid and food or fluids come back up into your esophagus. Home remedies include avoiding certain foods and drinks, eating smaller meals and the right healthy foods, and finding the right sleeping position.
Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), happens when stomach acid and food or fluids come back up into your esophagus. Home remedies include avoiding certain foods and drinks, eating smaller meals and the right healthy foods, and finding the right sleeping position.

Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), happens when stomach acid and food or fluids come back up into your esophagus. It can be an occasional problem, or you can have repeated symptoms in the form of a chronic condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Acid reflux is a digestive disorder that affects many people, from infants to older adults. You can get GERD at any age. It happens when the muscle at the bottom of your esophagus, called the lower esophageal sphincter, allows stomach contents to move upward.

Feeling heartburn is quite common. You may notice it after eating an especially big meal. About 20 out of 100 people in Western countries experience heartburn or acid reflux in their life. But if you have constant or severe heartburn and acid reflux, you may have GERD.

Acid reflux can be painful and may be triggered by certain situations. While it often feels like heartburn, other symptoms include: 

These symptoms can become worse if you lie down or bend over after eating. While anyone can have acid reflux, certain conditions make it more likely that you’ll experience it: 

7 home remedies for acid reflux

If you are experiencing recurrent acid reflux symptoms, there are remedies you can try at home to alleviate your pain and prevent future episodes. Seven home remedies for acid reflux include: 

Avoid certain food and drinks

You can still eat a lot of your favorite foods if you have acid reflux. However, there are certain things that are more likely to induce acid reflux than others. Some foods and drinks you should avoid include: 

You don’t have to give these foods up completely, but it’s a good idea to see if eating less of them improves your reflux. 

Eat smaller meals

You may experience acid reflux more frequently after larger meals when the stomach is full. Smaller meals spaced throughout your day can help minimize your chances of having acid reflux. 

Take it slow after eating

After you eat, try to remain in a seated position or go for a walk. Lying down after eating can send acid up into your esophagus. Try to finish eating at least 3 hours before going to bed.

Find the right sleeping position

The best sleeping position to reduce acid reflux is having your head 6 to 8 inches higher than your feet. Stacked pillows usually don’t provide enough support, so try using a foam wedge to prop up your upper body instead.

Make lifestyle changes

Your doctor may suggest that you try to lose weight to relieve your acid reflux. Increased weight can weaken your lower esophageal sphincter which allows acid into your esophagus. Nicotine can also relax the lower esophageal sphincter. If you smoke, it may be time to kick the habit.

Check your medications

Some medications like postmenopausal estrogen, tricyclic antidepressants, and NSAIDs may cause heartburn and acid reflux. 

Eat the right foods

Incorporating these foods into your diet may help your overall acid reflux pain

  • High fiber foods like oatmeal, brown rice, sweet potatoes, carrots, beets, and green vegetables make you feel more full and help keep your meals small.
  • Alkaline foods like bananas, melons, cauliflower, fennel, and nuts have a higher pH and can help offset strong stomach acid.
  • Watery foods like celery, cucumber, lettuce, watermelon, broth-based soups, and herbal tea can help dilute your stomach acid.

Risks and outlook

Acid reflux or GERD may be a lifelong condition that you have to manage. If your symptoms don’t improve with home remedies and lifestyle changes, you may need to see a doctor. 

Your gastroenterologist will make a diagnosis and determine a treatment plan. You may have to take an acid reducer to relieve your heartburn and pain.

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Medically Reviewed on 3/5/2021
References
American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)."

Franciscan Health: "Home Remedies For Heartburn (And When You Need A Doctor)."

Harvard Health Publishing: "9 ways to reduce acid reflux without medication."

Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care: "Heartburn and GERD: Overview."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "GERD Diet: Foods That Help with Acid Reflux (Heartburn)."

National Health Service: "Heartburn and acid reflux."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Adults."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Symptoms & Causes of GER & GERD"