Yeast Infection (in Women and Men)

  • Medical Author:
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

  • Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD
    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

    Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

What about recurrent yeast infections?

A recurrent yeast infection occurs when a woman has four or more infections in one year that are not related to antibiotic use. Recurrent yeast infections may be related to an underlying medical condition such as impaired immunity and may require more aggressive treatment. This can include longer courses of topical treatments, oral medications, or a combination of the two.

How can you protect yourself from contracting a yeast infection from your sexual partner?

Condoms may help prevent transmission of a yeast infection from women to men, but they are not completely effective since there may be contact with areas of the body not covered by the condom.

Avoiding intercourse when a woman has symptoms of a yeast infection is the best way to prevent spreading of the infection.

Reviewed on 6/23/2016
References
REFERENCES:

Eckert, L. Acute Vulvovaginitis. New N Engl J Med 2006; 355:1244-1252.

Medscape. Medscape, Vulvovaginitis

MedscapeReference.com. Vaginitis.

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